2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158422
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing Distress Protocols for Research on Sensitive Topics
Abstract:
Developing Distress Protocols for Research on Sensitive Topics
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Martsolf, Donna, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Contact Address:347 Henderson Hall, College of Nursing, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Contact Telephone:330.672.8822
Co-Authors:D.S. Martsolf, C.B. Draucker, C. Poole, Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH;
Problem: Conducting research on sensitive topics (ie: those that cause stigmatization, harm a social group, challenge sacred values, or induce or exacerbate emotional distress) raises a number of ethical issues. Funding bodies and institutional review boards require that researchers minimize potential risks and ensure that benefits of the research outweigh these risks. In emotionally-charged studies, researchers need to identify potential participants who might be particularly vulnerable to harm. Yet scientific and research ethics literatures offer little practical guidance to assist researchers in developing protocols to ensure these protections. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop two protocols that address risks related to emotional distress in an on-going, qualitative, community-based study of adolescent dating violence. Conceptual Framework: Three broad principles of ethical research (autonomy, beneficence, and justice) identified in the Belmont Report for the Protection of Human Subjects served as a basis for these protocols. METHODS: The first protocol was developed to identify individuals at high risk for adverse emotional reactions by a telephone screening. The second protocol was developed to guide interviewer responses to emotional distress expressed by participants during the research interviews. Because the aim of the protocols is to protect participants from the harm, the ethical principle in the foreground of their development was nonmaleficence. In constructing the protocols we sought to balance beneficence (nonmaleficence) with autonomy and justice. Results: In the two protocols, we(a)specified exclusion criteria that promoted inclusiveness and excluded only those at highest risk,(b)designed screening questions that involved participants in risk assessment whenever possible, and (c)identified minimally-intrusive strategies to reduce the risk of harm. The two protocols will be presented in detail. Implications: The two protocols might serve as templates for those who research sensitive topics and seek to outline procedures for managing emotional distress. The process of developing the protocols caused the authors to re-consider some previously held assumptions of human subject protections in sensitive-topic research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping Distress Protocols for Research on Sensitive Topicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158422-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing Distress Protocols for Research on Sensitive Topics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martsolf, Donna, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">347 Henderson Hall, College of Nursing, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.672.8822</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dmartsol@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D.S. Martsolf, C.B. Draucker, C. Poole, Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Conducting research on sensitive topics (ie: those that cause stigmatization, harm a social group, challenge sacred values, or induce or exacerbate emotional distress) raises a number of ethical issues. Funding bodies and institutional review boards require that researchers minimize potential risks and ensure that benefits of the research outweigh these risks. In emotionally-charged studies, researchers need to identify potential participants who might be particularly vulnerable to harm. Yet scientific and research ethics literatures offer little practical guidance to assist researchers in developing protocols to ensure these protections. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop two protocols that address risks related to emotional distress in an on-going, qualitative, community-based study of adolescent dating violence. Conceptual Framework: Three broad principles of ethical research (autonomy, beneficence, and justice) identified in the Belmont Report for the Protection of Human Subjects served as a basis for these protocols. METHODS: The first protocol was developed to identify individuals at high risk for adverse emotional reactions by a telephone screening. The second protocol was developed to guide interviewer responses to emotional distress expressed by participants during the research interviews. Because the aim of the protocols is to protect participants from the harm, the ethical principle in the foreground of their development was nonmaleficence. In constructing the protocols we sought to balance beneficence (nonmaleficence) with autonomy and justice. Results: In the two protocols, we(a)specified exclusion criteria that promoted inclusiveness and excluded only those at highest risk,(b)designed screening questions that involved participants in risk assessment whenever possible, and (c)identified minimally-intrusive strategies to reduce the risk of harm. The two protocols will be presented in detail. Implications: The two protocols might serve as templates for those who research sensitive topics and seek to outline procedures for managing emotional distress. The process of developing the protocols caused the authors to re-consider some previously held assumptions of human subject protections in sensitive-topic research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:02:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:02:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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