Motivating Forces for Parents Receiving Prenatal Diagnosis of Fetal Congenital Heart Defect

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158423
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivating Forces for Parents Receiving Prenatal Diagnosis of Fetal Congenital Heart Defect
Abstract:
Motivating Forces for Parents Receiving Prenatal Diagnosis of Fetal Congenital Heart Defect
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:McKechnie, Anne, MS, RN, IBCLC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:600 Highland Ave., CSC K6/374, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:608 263-9040
Co-Authors:A.C. McKechnie, K. Pridham, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI;
Background. The challenges surrounding an infant's diagnosis of a congenital heart defect (CHD) heighten parental stress and complicate adaptation associated with birthing and parenting a new infant. The internal working model (IWM) construct (Bowlby, 1988) may be used to explore parents' adaptation in terms of their motivating forces (MF). A MF directs and energizes parenting thought, action, and emotion, whether pre- or postnatally. Little is known about IWMs or the related MFs of parents after a prenatal diagnosis. Purpose. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine types and features of the MFs during pregnancy that parents described retrospectively at 1 month postnatally. The sample for this study was drawn from a larger longitudinal study extending through the first year of life for infants with a complex CHD. Method. Fourteen of 26 families of diverse ethnicity, received prenatal diagnoses and participated in semi-structured interviews conducted in their homes. The transcribed interviews were analyzed, and consensus reached, by a 2-member research team using directed content analysis (Hsieh & Shannon, 2005; Miles & Huberman 1994). Results. Six classes of MFs were found, including: (a) preparing heart and mind; (b) concerning baby as a person; (c) strengthening family; (d) protecting self; (e) promoting parenting identity; and (f) working for the good of others. A coding manual documents categories in each class. Emotional and cognitive processes among parents varied in specific focus, depth, and change over time. Conclusions. This study contributes to understanding the MFs that organize, direct, and drive parenting behavior during the prenatal period and what may be a critical formative phase of the parent-infant relationship. This preliminary understanding of MFs of parents receiving a fetal CHD diagnosis during pregnancy may assist researchers in designing parent-tailored, family-centered interventions and support clinicians in assessing adaptation and providing anticipatory guidance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivating Forces for Parents Receiving Prenatal Diagnosis of Fetal Congenital Heart Defecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158423-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivating Forces for Parents Receiving Prenatal Diagnosis of Fetal Congenital Heart Defect</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McKechnie, Anne, MS, RN, IBCLC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">600 Highland Ave., CSC K6/374, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608 263-9040</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amckechnie@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A.C. McKechnie, K. Pridham, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background. The challenges surrounding an infant's diagnosis of a congenital heart defect (CHD) heighten parental stress and complicate adaptation associated with birthing and parenting a new infant. The internal working model (IWM) construct (Bowlby, 1988) may be used to explore parents' adaptation in terms of their motivating forces (MF). A MF directs and energizes parenting thought, action, and emotion, whether pre- or postnatally. Little is known about IWMs or the related MFs of parents after a prenatal diagnosis. Purpose. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine types and features of the MFs during pregnancy that parents described retrospectively at 1 month postnatally. The sample for this study was drawn from a larger longitudinal study extending through the first year of life for infants with a complex CHD. Method. Fourteen of 26 families of diverse ethnicity, received prenatal diagnoses and participated in semi-structured interviews conducted in their homes. The transcribed interviews were analyzed, and consensus reached, by a 2-member research team using directed content analysis (Hsieh &amp; Shannon, 2005; Miles &amp; Huberman 1994). Results. Six classes of MFs were found, including: (a) preparing heart and mind; (b) concerning baby as a person; (c) strengthening family; (d) protecting self; (e) promoting parenting identity; and (f) working for the good of others. A coding manual documents categories in each class. Emotional and cognitive processes among parents varied in specific focus, depth, and change over time. Conclusions. This study contributes to understanding the MFs that organize, direct, and drive parenting behavior during the prenatal period and what may be a critical formative phase of the parent-infant relationship. This preliminary understanding of MFs of parents receiving a fetal CHD diagnosis during pregnancy may assist researchers in designing parent-tailored, family-centered interventions and support clinicians in assessing adaptation and providing anticipatory guidance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:02:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:02:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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