Examining the Link between Health Status, Global Self-Worth and Overweight Among African American Adolescent Females

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158426
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining the Link between Health Status, Global Self-Worth and Overweight Among African American Adolescent Females
Abstract:
Examining the Link between Health Status, Global Self-Worth and Overweight Among African American Adolescent Females
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Powell-Young, Yolanda, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Contact Address:305 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, USA
Contact Telephone:504-289-5423
Co-Authors:Y. Powell-Young, M.K. Clark, College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;
Purpose: Obesity continues to be recognized as a national health crisis that is disparately stratified by ethnicity, age, gender, and geography. This is the first investigation to explore the association of body mass index with perceived health status and global self-worth among an African American cohort. Framework: Pender's Revised Health Promotion Model guided the study. Sample: Data were obtained from a convenience sample of N=264 African American adolescent females, 14-18 years, attending public high school in New Orleans, Louisiana. Methods: A single item measure for overall self-rated health was captured with the question, "compared to other people your age how do you rate your present health status?" The Harter Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents was used to evaluate global self-worth. Measured height and weight values were used to calculate BMI. Categorization by weight status was completed according to CDC standards and percentiles (i.e., healthy weight [HW], equal to or greater than 5th to < 85th; at risk for overweight [AROW], equal to or greater than 85th to < 95th; overweight [OW],equal to or greater than 95th). Pearson's Chi Square was used to assess the variability in perceived health status as a function of weight. Mann- Whitney U tests evaluated the relationship between self-worth and weight. Results: No significant association between BMI groupings and self-report general health was found, Pearson X2(4, =264) = 4.4, p =.31. Individuals classified as AROW had significantly lower self-worth scores than the HW group, z = -2.7, p < .01. Comparative analyses with the remaining groups produced no significant differences in scores. Conclusion: Being overweight may not be perceived as a viable health threat among African American teens. However, degree of adiposity may contribute to a lower sense of global self-worth that may be unrecognized as a precursor for physiological and or psychological health risk.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining the Link between Health Status, Global Self-Worth and Overweight Among African American Adolescent Femalesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158426-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining the Link between Health Status, Global Self-Worth and Overweight Among African American Adolescent Females</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Powell-Young, Yolanda, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">305 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">504-289-5423</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yolanda-young@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Y. Powell-Young, M.K. Clark, College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Obesity continues to be recognized as a national health crisis that is disparately stratified by ethnicity, age, gender, and geography. This is the first investigation to explore the association of body mass index with perceived health status and global self-worth among an African American cohort. Framework: Pender's Revised Health Promotion Model guided the study. Sample: Data were obtained from a convenience sample of N=264 African American adolescent females, 14-18 years, attending public high school in New Orleans, Louisiana. Methods: A single item measure for overall self-rated health was captured with the question, &quot;compared to other people your age how do you rate your present health status?&quot; The Harter Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents was used to evaluate global self-worth. Measured height and weight values were used to calculate BMI. Categorization by weight status was completed according to CDC standards and percentiles (i.e., healthy weight [HW], equal to or greater than 5th to &lt; 85th; at risk for overweight [AROW], equal to or greater than 85th to &lt; 95th; overweight [OW],equal to or greater than 95th). Pearson's Chi Square was used to assess the variability in perceived health status as a function of weight. Mann- Whitney U tests evaluated the relationship between self-worth and weight. Results: No significant association between BMI groupings and self-report general health was found, Pearson X2(4, =264) = 4.4, p =.31. Individuals classified as AROW had significantly lower self-worth scores than the HW group, z = -2.7, p &lt; .01. Comparative analyses with the remaining groups produced no significant differences in scores. Conclusion: Being overweight may not be perceived as a viable health threat among African American teens. However, degree of adiposity may contribute to a lower sense of global self-worth that may be unrecognized as a precursor for physiological and or psychological health risk.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:02:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:02:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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