Development of The Concept of Communicative Participation in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158430
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of The Concept of Communicative Participation in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer
Abstract:
Development of The Concept of Communicative Participation in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Swore Fletcher, Barbara, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:5760, Omaha, NE, 65330, USA
Contact Telephone:402 253-7955
Co-Authors:B.A. Swore Fletcher, K.L. Schumacher, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; W. Lydiatt, School of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;
Purpose: Communication, an integral component of life, is often compromised for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), significantly affecting their quality of life (QOL). Communicative participation, a concept emphasizing the day-to-day functional aspects of communication, is potentially relevant for HNC research. IT was developed using the neurologic population and has not been used with HNC patients. Basic concept development work is needed prior to using communicative participation as a variable in HNC research. The purpose of this qualitative study was to develop the concept of communicative participation in patients undergoing treatment for HNC and their primary family caregivers. Conceptual Framework: The World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF), was the conceptual framework. Subjects: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study with four waves of data collection, beginning within 8 weeks of diagnosis and occurring at 4 week intervals thereafter. The sample consisted of newly diagnosed HNC patients and family caregivers. Methods: Data collection included semi-structured interviews, observation, and field notes. Data analysis consisted of line by line coding and constant comparison. Longitudinal data facilitates comparisons across time and between participants. Codes will be organized into conceptual categories. Data collection is complete and data analysis is underway. Results: Results indicate different patterns of loss and recovery of communicative participation during cancer treatment and early survivorship. Patient responses to these patterns and the effect of patient/family caregiver interactions are key foci of our analysis. These results will be used as a basis for measurement of communicative participation in future research. This research has implications for better understanding the functioning and QOL of HNC survivors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of The Concept of Communicative Participation in Patients with Head and Neck Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158430-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development of The Concept of Communicative Participation in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Swore Fletcher, Barbara, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5760, Omaha, NE, 65330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402 253-7955</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bsworefletcher@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B.A. Swore Fletcher, K.L. Schumacher, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; W. Lydiatt, School of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Communication, an integral component of life, is often compromised for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), significantly affecting their quality of life (QOL). Communicative participation, a concept emphasizing the day-to-day functional aspects of communication, is potentially relevant for HNC research. IT was developed using the neurologic population and has not been used with HNC patients. Basic concept development work is needed prior to using communicative participation as a variable in HNC research. The purpose of this qualitative study was to develop the concept of communicative participation in patients undergoing treatment for HNC and their primary family caregivers. Conceptual Framework: The World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF), was the conceptual framework. Subjects: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study with four waves of data collection, beginning within 8 weeks of diagnosis and occurring at 4 week intervals thereafter. The sample consisted of newly diagnosed HNC patients and family caregivers. Methods: Data collection included semi-structured interviews, observation, and field notes. Data analysis consisted of line by line coding and constant comparison. Longitudinal data facilitates comparisons across time and between participants. Codes will be organized into conceptual categories. Data collection is complete and data analysis is underway. Results: Results indicate different patterns of loss and recovery of communicative participation during cancer treatment and early survivorship. Patient responses to these patterns and the effect of patient/family caregiver interactions are key foci of our analysis. These results will be used as a basis for measurement of communicative participation in future research. This research has implications for better understanding the functioning and QOL of HNC survivors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:02:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:02:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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