Understanding the Prevalence of Toileting-Related Inpatient Falls in Acute Care Settings from the Fall Incident Reports

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158434
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding the Prevalence of Toileting-Related Inpatient Falls in Acute Care Settings from the Fall Incident Reports
Abstract:
Understanding the Prevalence of Toileting-Related Inpatient Falls in Acute Care Settings from the Fall Incident Reports
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Tzeng, Huey-Ming, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Michigan, School of Nursing
Title:Division of Nursing Business and Health Systems
Contact Address:400 North Ingalls, Room, 4156, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734-3580358
Co-Authors:H. Tzeng, The University of Michigan, School of Nursing, Division of Nursing Business and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, MI; C. Yin, , Chinese Culture University, Department of History, Taipei, TAIWAN;
This exploratory study used content analyses to identify the themes of toileting-related falls and determined the prevalence of toileting-related fall incidents occurred in acute inpatient care settings. Toileting refers to all the activities that are intended to relieve elimination needs, and involves issues of the design of furnishing, equipment and staffing effectiveness. This research was conducted in a Michigan community hospital and used the archived fall incident reports that occurred in five acute, adult units (n=547; July 2005-June 2008). It used the tabulated information and narratives of the reports. Chi-square tests and binary logistic regression analyses were used. The results showed that 45.2% (n=247) of all falls were linked to toileting; 12.8% (n=70) were related to get out of or back to bed, 20.8% (n=114) occurred on the way to or from the bath room or bedside commode, and 10% happened when using the toilet or the bedside commode (e.g., slipped off the toilet). A total of 281 falls (51.4%) were bed-related. Chi-square tests found that shifts, falls being observed, assisted, patients being high-risk for falls and physical restrains in use were linked to toileting-related falls. Regression analyses showed that if a fall was not occurred during the 7-11PM shift and the patient who fell had physical restrains in use, this fall would tend to be related to toileting. If a fall was observed by staff or family visitors and was not occurred during the 7-11AM and 3-7PM shifts, this toileting-related fall would tend to be associated with bed. Fall prevention efforts may play against promoting functional independence. Using low beds and teaching patients to use the prone position to get out of bed were suggested to prevent toileting-related falls. The ultimate goal is to promote safe hospital stays and prevent patient falls as related to extrinsic factors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding the Prevalence of Toileting-Related Inpatient Falls in Acute Care Settings from the Fall Incident Reportsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158434-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding the Prevalence of Toileting-Related Inpatient Falls in Acute Care Settings from the Fall Incident Reports</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tzeng, Huey-Ming, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Michigan, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Division of Nursing Business and Health Systems</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">400 North Ingalls, Room, 4156, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-3580358</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tzeng_hueyming@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">H. Tzeng, The University of Michigan, School of Nursing, Division of Nursing Business and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, MI; C. Yin, , Chinese Culture University, Department of History, Taipei, TAIWAN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This exploratory study used content analyses to identify the themes of toileting-related falls and determined the prevalence of toileting-related fall incidents occurred in acute inpatient care settings. Toileting refers to all the activities that are intended to relieve elimination needs, and involves issues of the design of furnishing, equipment and staffing effectiveness. This research was conducted in a Michigan community hospital and used the archived fall incident reports that occurred in five acute, adult units (n=547; July 2005-June 2008). It used the tabulated information and narratives of the reports. Chi-square tests and binary logistic regression analyses were used. The results showed that 45.2% (n=247) of all falls were linked to toileting; 12.8% (n=70) were related to get out of or back to bed, 20.8% (n=114) occurred on the way to or from the bath room or bedside commode, and 10% happened when using the toilet or the bedside commode (e.g., slipped off the toilet). A total of 281 falls (51.4%) were bed-related. Chi-square tests found that shifts, falls being observed, assisted, patients being high-risk for falls and physical restrains in use were linked to toileting-related falls. Regression analyses showed that if a fall was not occurred during the 7-11PM shift and the patient who fell had physical restrains in use, this fall would tend to be related to toileting. If a fall was observed by staff or family visitors and was not occurred during the 7-11AM and 3-7PM shifts, this toileting-related fall would tend to be associated with bed. Fall prevention efforts may play against promoting functional independence. Using low beds and teaching patients to use the prone position to get out of bed were suggested to prevent toileting-related falls. The ultimate goal is to promote safe hospital stays and prevent patient falls as related to extrinsic factors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:02:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:02:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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