2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158442
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life in Women with Type 2 Diabetes
Abstract:
Quality of Life in Women with Type 2 Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Penckofer, Sue, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Dean for Research & Professor
Contact Address:SON, Building 105/Room 2840, 2160 S. First Avenue, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA
Co-Authors:Kelly Oney, MSN, RN, Doctoral Student, School of Nursing; Maryann Emanuele, MD, Professor, School of Medicine; Steve Creech, MS, Biostatistician; Carol Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, College of Nursing
Women with diabetes are six times more likely to die of heart disease than women without diabetes. In midlife, women commonly experience depression, stress, and sleep alterations. In women with diabetes, these factors have been associated with increased levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). This is important because a 1% increase in HbA1c is associated with a significant increase in risk of cardiovascular events. This cross-sectional study examined the quality of life (QOL) in diabetic women using the Wilson and Clearly Health-Related QOL Framework. Sixty six women with type 2 diabetes came to a diabetes center where HbA1c was collected as well as the following self-report measures: depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: CES-D), sleep (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index), stress (Perceived Stressor Scale), perceived health (SF-12 Health Survey), social support (Medical Outcomes Support Survey), and QOL (Ferrans and Powers QOL Index-Diabetes Version). The mean age of women was 54 years and the average length of time with diabetes was 8 years. Depression, stress, and social support explained 54% of the variance in QOL in a multivariate regression model. Almost half of the sample (47%) reported depressive symptoms. Therefore, women were divided as either having depressive symptoms or not having depressive symptoms using CES-D guidelines. Women with depressive symptoms reported poorer sleep quality (p=.002), greater stress (p<.001), poorer health (p<.001), less social support (p<.05), and lower QOL (p<.001). HbA1c was higher in women having depressive symptoms (8.1 vs. 7.7). Although this difference was not statistically significant, it has clinical relevance. This research suggests that depression, sleep, and stress are important symptoms and significantly impact QOL in women with type 2 diabetes. Because these symptoms have been associated with higher HbA1c, targeting their management is important to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life in Women with Type 2 Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158442-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality of Life in Women with Type 2 Diabetes </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Penckofer, Sue, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research &amp; Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Building 105/Room 2840, 2160 S. First Avenue, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kelly Oney, MSN, RN, Doctoral Student, School of Nursing; Maryann Emanuele, MD, Professor, School of Medicine; Steve Creech, MS, Biostatistician; Carol Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, College of Nursing </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Women with diabetes are six times more likely to die of heart disease than women without diabetes. In midlife, women commonly experience depression, stress, and sleep alterations. In women with diabetes, these factors have been associated with increased levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). This is important because a 1% increase in HbA1c is associated with a significant increase in risk of cardiovascular events. This cross-sectional study examined the quality of life (QOL) in diabetic women using the Wilson and Clearly Health-Related QOL Framework. Sixty six women with type 2 diabetes came to a diabetes center where HbA1c was collected as well as the following self-report measures: depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: CES-D), sleep (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index), stress (Perceived Stressor Scale), perceived health (SF-12 Health Survey), social support (Medical Outcomes Support Survey), and QOL (Ferrans and Powers QOL Index-Diabetes Version). The mean age of women was 54 years and the average length of time with diabetes was 8 years. Depression, stress, and social support explained 54% of the variance in QOL in a multivariate regression model. Almost half of the sample (47%) reported depressive symptoms. Therefore, women were divided as either having depressive symptoms or not having depressive symptoms using CES-D guidelines. Women with depressive symptoms reported poorer sleep quality (p=.002), greater stress (p&lt;.001), poorer health (p&lt;.001), less social support (p&lt;.05), and lower QOL (p&lt;.001). HbA1c was higher in women having depressive symptoms (8.1 vs. 7.7). Although this difference was not statistically significant, it has clinical relevance. This research suggests that depression, sleep, and stress are important symptoms and significantly impact QOL in women with type 2 diabetes. Because these symptoms have been associated with higher HbA1c, targeting their management is important to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:03:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:03:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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