2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158448
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Perceptions of Self-Mutilators
Abstract:
Nurses' Perceptions of Self-Mutilators
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Timmons, Melissa, BSN, RN
Title:Ms.
Contact Address:Research CON, 11831 N. Bellefontaine Avenue, Kansas City, MO, 64156, USA
The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify nursing staff perceptions of patients who are self-mutilators. Identification and awareness of these perceptions can influence the caregiver’s role with these patients and their treatment. Phenomenological data was obtained by using semi-structured interviews of 5-10 voluntary nurses who met the predetermined criteria of being English speaking, literate, part-time/full-time Psychiatric Registered Nurses with three plus years familiarity with patients who are self-mutilators. A phenomenological methodology was selected to obtain an understanding of the nurses’ lived experiences of caring for patients who self-mutilate. This type of design allowed for change and growth to transpire, due to the inevitability of evolution to occur within the interviewing process. This data will be analyzed using Colaizzi’s 7-step reductionist methodology and hyperRESEARCH software program. Within the development of a nurse-client relationship, nursing perceptions are used to gain understanding of individuals who live with a mental illness. Identification and awareness of these perceptions can influence the caregiver’s role and treatment approaches. This type of awareness of perceptions may help the building of trust, which is an important necessity between the patient and caregiver in establishing an effective, therapeutic relationship for the delivery of the quality care. The results of this study will identify and illustrate perceptions of nurses that can affect the nature and manner of care given to this specialized group of patients. The outcomes may impact how nurses interact with these patients so they will work in a more conscious manner and consequently have a more positive effect on the patient’s progress towards attainable mental health results.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Perceptions of Self-Mutilatorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158448-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses' Perceptions of Self-Mutilators </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Timmons, Melissa, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ms.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Research CON, 11831 N. Bellefontaine Avenue, Kansas City, MO, 64156, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify nursing staff perceptions of patients who are self-mutilators. Identification and awareness of these perceptions can influence the caregiver&rsquo;s role with these patients and their treatment. Phenomenological data was obtained by using semi-structured interviews of 5-10 voluntary nurses who met the predetermined criteria of being English speaking, literate, part-time/full-time Psychiatric Registered Nurses with three plus years familiarity with patients who are self-mutilators. A phenomenological methodology was selected to obtain an understanding of the nurses&rsquo; lived experiences of caring for patients who self-mutilate. This type of design allowed for change and growth to transpire, due to the inevitability of evolution to occur within the interviewing process. This data will be analyzed using Colaizzi&rsquo;s 7-step reductionist methodology and hyperRESEARCH software program. Within the development of a nurse-client relationship, nursing perceptions are used to gain understanding of individuals who live with a mental illness. Identification and awareness of these perceptions can influence the caregiver&rsquo;s role and treatment approaches. This type of awareness of perceptions may help the building of trust, which is an important necessity between the patient and caregiver in establishing an effective, therapeutic relationship for the delivery of the quality care. The results of this study will identify and illustrate perceptions of nurses that can affect the nature and manner of care given to this specialized group of patients. The outcomes may impact how nurses interact with these patients so they will work in a more conscious manner and consequently have a more positive effect on the patient&rsquo;s progress towards attainable mental health results. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:03:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:03:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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