2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158450
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Process of Disclosure Between HIV Positive Mothers and Their Children
Abstract:
The Process of Disclosure Between HIV Positive Mothers and Their Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Vallerand, April, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing - Cohn Bldg. #364, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Co-Authors:Gail Brumitt, PhD, Associate Director; Edythe Hough, EdD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Laura Pittiglio, MSN, RN, Doctoral Student; Donna Marvicsin, MSN, RN, Doctoral Student
Mothers with HIV/AIDS must decide whether to disclose their HIV status to their children. The child’s perspective of disclosure is not well understood. Purpose: To understand the process of disclosure from the mother’s and child’s perspectives. Research Question: What is the experience of disclosure for HIV positive mothers and their children? Method: Qualitative, semi structured interviews were conducted with 50 women and 18 children ages 10-18 years whose mother’s had disclosed their HIV status. Interview technique was open-ended with the use of probes to clarify information throughout the interviews. Analysis: Data from the interviews was transcribed and data analysis was performed using NUD*IST software. The constant comparative method was used and indicators reflective of the process of disclosure were isolated and coded. Consistent codes, in terms of the process of disclosure, became categories. Coding continued until saturation was evident. Multiple coding of single interviews ensured inter-rater reliability between members of the research team. Findings: The decision to disclose was dependent on the child’s developmental level and the degree of the mothers’ illness. In some cases, outsiders who disclosed the mother’s status to her children forced disclosure. Positive aspects of disclosure from the mother child dyads included open, honest communication and closer relationships between mothers and children. Common negative themes emanating from the data included fear, uncertainty, forced secrecy for fear of being ostracized, behavioral changes in the children, and shifting responsibilities between the mother and the child. Findings of the study suggest disclosure and all it entails remains a vital issue for mothers who are HIV positive. Implications: Understanding process of disclosure of the mother’s HIV status to her children will help to direct interventions to facilitate effective coping in this vulnerable population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Process of Disclosure Between HIV Positive Mothers and Their Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158450-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Process of Disclosure Between HIV Positive Mothers and Their Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vallerand, April, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing - Cohn Bldg. #364, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gail Brumitt, PhD, Associate Director; Edythe Hough, EdD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Laura Pittiglio, MSN, RN, Doctoral Student; Donna Marvicsin, MSN, RN, Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Mothers with HIV/AIDS must decide whether to disclose their HIV status to their children. The child&rsquo;s perspective of disclosure is not well understood. Purpose: To understand the process of disclosure from the mother&rsquo;s and child&rsquo;s perspectives. Research Question: What is the experience of disclosure for HIV positive mothers and their children? Method: Qualitative, semi structured interviews were conducted with 50 women and 18 children ages 10-18 years whose mother&rsquo;s had disclosed their HIV status. Interview technique was open-ended with the use of probes to clarify information throughout the interviews. Analysis: Data from the interviews was transcribed and data analysis was performed using NUD*IST software. The constant comparative method was used and indicators reflective of the process of disclosure were isolated and coded. Consistent codes, in terms of the process of disclosure, became categories. Coding continued until saturation was evident. Multiple coding of single interviews ensured inter-rater reliability between members of the research team. Findings: The decision to disclose was dependent on the child&rsquo;s developmental level and the degree of the mothers&rsquo; illness. In some cases, outsiders who disclosed the mother&rsquo;s status to her children forced disclosure. Positive aspects of disclosure from the mother child dyads included open, honest communication and closer relationships between mothers and children. Common negative themes emanating from the data included fear, uncertainty, forced secrecy for fear of being ostracized, behavioral changes in the children, and shifting responsibilities between the mother and the child. Findings of the study suggest disclosure and all it entails remains a vital issue for mothers who are HIV positive. Implications: Understanding process of disclosure of the mother&rsquo;s HIV status to her children will help to direct interventions to facilitate effective coping in this vulnerable population. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:03:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:03:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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