2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158451
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Home-based Walking and Symptoms in Midlife African American and Caucasian Women
Abstract:
Home-based Walking and Symptoms in Midlife African American and Caucasian Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Wilbur, JoEllen, PhD, APN, FAAN
Title:Professor and Associate Dean
Contact Address:845 South Damen - Mail Code 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Arlene Miller; Judith McDevitt, PhD, APN; Peggy Chandler, PhD, Research Assistant Professor; Hyeonkyeiong Lee, MS, RN, Doctoral Student
The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of a 24- week moderate intensity, home -based walking program on the symptoms (vasomotor, genitourinary, sexual, pain, cognitive, physical, psychological) commonly experienced by midlife women. Background: Findings from the Women’s Health Initiative indicate that the risks of hormone therapy outweigh the benefits. Physical activity offers a safe alternative for the prevention of CVD which increases after menopause. We know less about the benefits of physical activity in the alleviation of symptoms at midlife. Methodology: Women were randomly assigned to a walking group, or a control group that delayed their participation for 24 weeks. Women in the walking group were oriented to the program, received an exercise prescription (walking 4X/week, 30 minutes, moderate intensity) and met with a staff member every two week to receive behavioral intervention strategies. The delay group met with staff as an attention control. Participants included 163 women (57 African American and 106 Caucasian), aged 45-65, not on hormone therapy and not currently physically active at leisure. The CES-D depression measure and Symptom Impact Inventory (33 symptoms) were administered, and serum blood for estradiol and follicle stimulating hormone were drawn at baseline and 24 weeks. For the walking group, adherence to the exercise prescription was measured with an exercise log and heart rate monitor. Results: Paired comparison t tests indicated that symptoms improved for both groups. ANOVAs showed that symptoms varied by menopausal status for both groups at baseline, but only for the control group at the end of 24 weeks. Walking women adhered to 64% of the expected 96 walks. Sleep improved significantly for women with the highest adherence. Discussion: Findings will address the benefits of walking at moderate intensity levels for the relief of symptoms experienced by midlife women not on hormone therapy. NINR, NIH R01NR004134
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHome-based Walking and Symptoms in Midlife African American and Caucasian Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158451-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Home-based Walking and Symptoms in Midlife African American and Caucasian Women </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilbur, JoEllen, PhD, APN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 South Damen - Mail Code 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Arlene Miller; Judith McDevitt, PhD, APN; Peggy Chandler, PhD, Research Assistant Professor; Hyeonkyeiong Lee, MS, RN, Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of a 24- week moderate intensity, home -based walking program on the symptoms (vasomotor, genitourinary, sexual, pain, cognitive, physical, psychological) commonly experienced by midlife women. Background: Findings from the Women&rsquo;s Health Initiative indicate that the risks of hormone therapy outweigh the benefits. Physical activity offers a safe alternative for the prevention of CVD which increases after menopause. We know less about the benefits of physical activity in the alleviation of symptoms at midlife. Methodology: Women were randomly assigned to a walking group, or a control group that delayed their participation for 24 weeks. Women in the walking group were oriented to the program, received an exercise prescription (walking 4X/week, 30 minutes, moderate intensity) and met with a staff member every two week to receive behavioral intervention strategies. The delay group met with staff as an attention control. Participants included 163 women (57 African American and 106 Caucasian), aged 45-65, not on hormone therapy and not currently physically active at leisure. The CES-D depression measure and Symptom Impact Inventory (33 symptoms) were administered, and serum blood for estradiol and follicle stimulating hormone were drawn at baseline and 24 weeks. For the walking group, adherence to the exercise prescription was measured with an exercise log and heart rate monitor. Results: Paired comparison t tests indicated that symptoms improved for both groups. ANOVAs showed that symptoms varied by menopausal status for both groups at baseline, but only for the control group at the end of 24 weeks. Walking women adhered to 64% of the expected 96 walks. Sleep improved significantly for women with the highest adherence. Discussion: Findings will address the benefits of walking at moderate intensity levels for the relief of symptoms experienced by midlife women not on hormone therapy. NINR, NIH R01NR004134</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:04:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:04:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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