2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158452
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pediatric Nurses' Knowledge and Behaviors regarding Pain
Abstract:
Pediatric Nurses' Knowledge and Behaviors regarding Pain
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Wrona, Sharon, MS, RN, PNP
Title:Ms.
Contact Address:658 Ulverston Drive, Dayton, OH, 43230, USA
Despite research data to support medicating patients for pain, children are still being inadequately treated with pain medication. Purpose: This study examined the nurse’s knowledge and behaviors of management of pain in the pediatric population. Specifically, this study explored the relationship among selected variables of educational level, years of pediatric nursing experience, and clinical unit working on and knowledge prior to a hospital based educational program. Conceptual Framework: Clinical decision making in nursing for pain management developed by Ferrell, Ebert, McCaffery, and Grant (1991) is the conceptual framework for this study. Methods: An exploratory descriptive study took place at a 300-bed JCAHO accredited pediatric hospital in central Ohio. The data were collected from 107 registered nurses working in the inpatient setting using the Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey regarding pain (PNKAS). The survey was modified from the Ferrell and McCaffery’s Nurses’ Knowledge and Attitude Survey Regarding Pain (NKAS) by Manworren (2000) using language specific to pediatrics. Findings: The mean total score of nurses’ knowledge and attitudes was thirty-one out of forty-two (73%). In addition the PNKAS questions were divided into four subscales with the nurses surveyed scoring 82% on general knowledge, 80% on assessment, 41% on pharmacological general, and 25 % on pharmacological specific. The only demographic variable that influenced score was unit worked p=. 003 with Hematology/Oncology Unit scoring best and Perioperative areas scoring least. Conclusion: Findings indicate that nurses have a good general knowledge of pediatric pain. However, nurses need more education in pain related to assessment; pharmacological management including opioids, non-opioids, and adjunctive medications; risks of addiction; risks of respiratory depression; and interventions of pediatric pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePediatric Nurses' Knowledge and Behaviors regarding Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158452-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pediatric Nurses' Knowledge and Behaviors regarding Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wrona, Sharon, MS, RN, PNP</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ms.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">658 Ulverston Drive, Dayton, OH, 43230, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite research data to support medicating patients for pain, children are still being inadequately treated with pain medication. Purpose: This study examined the nurse&rsquo;s knowledge and behaviors of management of pain in the pediatric population. Specifically, this study explored the relationship among selected variables of educational level, years of pediatric nursing experience, and clinical unit working on and knowledge prior to a hospital based educational program. Conceptual Framework: Clinical decision making in nursing for pain management developed by Ferrell, Ebert, McCaffery, and Grant (1991) is the conceptual framework for this study. Methods: An exploratory descriptive study took place at a 300-bed JCAHO accredited pediatric hospital in central Ohio. The data were collected from 107 registered nurses working in the inpatient setting using the Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey regarding pain (PNKAS). The survey was modified from the Ferrell and McCaffery&rsquo;s Nurses&rsquo; Knowledge and Attitude Survey Regarding Pain (NKAS) by Manworren (2000) using language specific to pediatrics. Findings: The mean total score of nurses&rsquo; knowledge and attitudes was thirty-one out of forty-two (73%). In addition the PNKAS questions were divided into four subscales with the nurses surveyed scoring 82% on general knowledge, 80% on assessment, 41% on pharmacological general, and 25 % on pharmacological specific. The only demographic variable that influenced score was unit worked p=. 003 with Hematology/Oncology Unit scoring best and Perioperative areas scoring least. Conclusion: Findings indicate that nurses have a good general knowledge of pediatric pain. However, nurses need more education in pain related to assessment; pharmacological management including opioids, non-opioids, and adjunctive medications; risks of addiction; risks of respiratory depression; and interventions of pediatric pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:04:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:04:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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