Effect of Method of Supplementation on Breastfeeding Frequency and Duration for Preterm Infants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158454
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Method of Supplementation on Breastfeeding Frequency and Duration for Preterm Infants
Abstract:
Effect of Method of Supplementation on Breastfeeding Frequency and Duration for Preterm Infants
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Abou Elfettoh, Amel, PhDc, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University/ Cario University
Title:Instructor
Contact Address:Faculty of Nursing, 2883 Van Aken Blvd, Cleveland, OH, 44120, USA
Contact Telephone:216 368 1869
Co-Authors:Donna Dowling, PhD, MN, Assistant Professor
Purpose: There continues to be controversy concerning the best method
for supplementation of hospitalized preterm infants whose mothers wish to
breastfeed. The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of using
cup feeding versus bottle feeding for the supplementation of breastfeeding
on frequency and duration of breastfeeding for preterm infants.
Theoretical Framework: WatsonÆs Learning Model hypothesizes that the
frequency of performing a behavior increases learning the behavior.
Consequently, infants who experience one method of oral feeding (bottle)
during hospitalization may have more difficulty learning a new oral
feeding behavior (breastfeeding) after discharge. Subjects: A convenience
sample of 60 singleton preterm infants between 34 and 37 weeksÆ
gestational age at birth whose mothers intended to breastfeed were
recruited from two neonatal intensive care units at Cairo University
Pediatric Hospital. Exclusion criteria included oxygen dependence or any
condition interfering with oral feeding. Method: A quasi-experimental
cohort design was used, with the control group (n=30) studied first.
Control group infants received only bottle feedings to supplement
breastfeeding during hospitalization. The experimental group (n=30) was
studied after data collection for the control group was completed; these
infants received only cup feedings to supplement breastfeeding during
hospitalization. During hospitalization frequency of breastfeeding, bottle
feedings and cup feedings, as well as volume of intake, were measured. All
infants were followed weekly after discharge to three months of age to
determine breastfeeding frequency and duration. Data Analysis: Data are
currently being analyzed using appropriate parametric and nonparametric
statistical procedures to test for differences between the bottle feeding
and cup feeding groups on breastfeeding outcomes. Conclusions: The
findings of this study will contribute to nursing knowledge concerning the
management of supplementation of breastfeeding for preterm infants.
Improving the duration of breastfeeding for preterm infants will
contribute to their long-term health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Method of Supplementation on Breastfeeding Frequency and Duration for Preterm Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158454-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Method of Supplementation on Breastfeeding Frequency and Duration for Preterm Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Abou Elfettoh, Amel, PhDc, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University/ Cario University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Faculty of Nursing, 2883 Van Aken Blvd, Cleveland, OH, 44120, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216 368 1869</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">axa188@cwru.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Donna Dowling, PhD, MN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: There continues to be controversy concerning the best method <br/> for supplementation of hospitalized preterm infants whose mothers wish to <br/> breastfeed. The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of using <br/> cup feeding versus bottle feeding for the supplementation of breastfeeding <br/> on frequency and duration of breastfeeding for preterm infants. <br/> Theoretical Framework: Watson&AElig;s Learning Model hypothesizes that the <br/> frequency of performing a behavior increases learning the behavior. <br/> Consequently, infants who experience one method of oral feeding (bottle) <br/> during hospitalization may have more difficulty learning a new oral <br/> feeding behavior (breastfeeding) after discharge. Subjects: A convenience <br/> sample of 60 singleton preterm infants between 34 and 37 weeks&AElig; <br/> gestational age at birth whose mothers intended to breastfeed were <br/> recruited from two neonatal intensive care units at Cairo University <br/> Pediatric Hospital. Exclusion criteria included oxygen dependence or any <br/> condition interfering with oral feeding. Method: A quasi-experimental <br/> cohort design was used, with the control group (n=30) studied first. <br/> Control group infants received only bottle feedings to supplement <br/> breastfeeding during hospitalization. The experimental group (n=30) was <br/> studied after data collection for the control group was completed; these <br/> infants received only cup feedings to supplement breastfeeding during <br/> hospitalization. During hospitalization frequency of breastfeeding, bottle <br/> feedings and cup feedings, as well as volume of intake, were measured. All <br/> infants were followed weekly after discharge to three months of age to <br/> determine breastfeeding frequency and duration. Data Analysis: Data are <br/> currently being analyzed using appropriate parametric and nonparametric <br/> statistical procedures to test for differences between the bottle feeding <br/> and cup feeding groups on breastfeeding outcomes. Conclusions: The <br/> findings of this study will contribute to nursing knowledge concerning the <br/> management of supplementation of breastfeeding for preterm infants. <br/> Improving the duration of breastfeeding for preterm infants will <br/> contribute to their long-term health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:04:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:04:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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