2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158455
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Research Findings from Social Interactions during Hospice Visits
Abstract:
Research Findings from Social Interactions during Hospice Visits
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Adamle, Kathleen, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Norwood St., Kent, OH, 44240, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8837
Purpose: This study investigated the spontaneous use of humor in
hospice settings using non-participant observation. While humor has been
identified as one of the few basic social phenomena occurring in all
groups throughout human history, it is one of the least studied or
understood phenomena of everyday interactions. Researchers in a number of
disciplines have studied the impact of humor on patients, yet little work
has been done on the spontaneous use of humor at end-of-life care.
Framework: Social interaction theory, which explains that people act on
the basis of "meanings" evolving from personal interaction and subjective
interpretation, framed the research questions and subsequent discussion of
findings. Subjects: The phenomenon of humor was studied by observing 17
RNs as they delivered care to 89 hospice patients and their families. In
addition to the nurse-patient dyad, 54 primary care givers were also
included in the observations. The total number of participants in the
study was 160. The total hospice visits observed by the researcher were
132 and occurred in two settings of hospice care (home or facility-based).
Methods: Using non-participant observation in an exploratory and
descriptive design, this study took a micro-analytical perspective to
examine the presence of humor during the social interaction process of
hospice work to analyze 132 observations. Results: The results revealed
that humor was present in 85% of the 132 observed nurse-based hospice
visits and also showed that hospice patients initiated humor 70% of the
time. These findings were constant, regardless of hospice settings. Humor
was shown to be spontaneous, as well as a frequent and prevalent part of
everyday hospice work. Conclusions: The results depict a unique view of
the humor phenomenon. This research adds a new perspective to the body of
knowledge of both the humor phenomenon and everyday nurse-patient
interactions that has implications for further research and nurse
education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResearch Findings from Social Interactions during Hospice Visitsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158455-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Research Findings from Social Interactions during Hospice Visits</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Adamle, Kathleen, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Norwood St., Kent, OH, 44240, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8837</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kadamle@kent.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study investigated the spontaneous use of humor in <br/> hospice settings using non-participant observation. While humor has been <br/> identified as one of the few basic social phenomena occurring in all <br/> groups throughout human history, it is one of the least studied or <br/> understood phenomena of everyday interactions. Researchers in a number of <br/> disciplines have studied the impact of humor on patients, yet little work <br/> has been done on the spontaneous use of humor at end-of-life care. <br/> Framework: Social interaction theory, which explains that people act on <br/> the basis of &quot;meanings&quot; evolving from personal interaction and subjective <br/> interpretation, framed the research questions and subsequent discussion of <br/> findings. Subjects: The phenomenon of humor was studied by observing 17 <br/> RNs as they delivered care to 89 hospice patients and their families. In <br/> addition to the nurse-patient dyad, 54 primary care givers were also <br/> included in the observations. The total number of participants in the <br/> study was 160. The total hospice visits observed by the researcher were <br/> 132 and occurred in two settings of hospice care (home or facility-based). <br/> Methods: Using non-participant observation in an exploratory and <br/> descriptive design, this study took a micro-analytical perspective to <br/> examine the presence of humor during the social interaction process of <br/> hospice work to analyze 132 observations. Results: The results revealed <br/> that humor was present in 85% of the 132 observed nurse-based hospice <br/> visits and also showed that hospice patients initiated humor 70% of the <br/> time. These findings were constant, regardless of hospice settings. Humor <br/> was shown to be spontaneous, as well as a frequent and prevalent part of <br/> everyday hospice work. Conclusions: The results depict a unique view of <br/> the humor phenomenon. This research adds a new perspective to the body of <br/> knowledge of both the humor phenomenon and everyday nurse-patient <br/> interactions that has implications for further research and nurse <br/> education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:04:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:04:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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