A Comparative Study of Health Care Disparity in Low Income African American and Caucasian Elders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158456
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparative Study of Health Care Disparity in Low Income African American and Caucasian Elders
Abstract:
A Comparative Study of Health Care Disparity in Low Income African American and Caucasian Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Aroian, Karen, PhD, MS, BS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:3135776251
Co-Authors:Jillon S. Vander Wal, PhD, Assistant Professor; Rosalind Peters, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; and Nutrena Tate, MSN, Pre-doctoral Fellow
African Americans have the highest morbidity and mortality rates of
all American racial and ethnic groups, yet are reported to utilize health
care less often than non-minority Caucasians. Understanding reasons for
low utilization of health care has promise for reducing these health
disparities. AndersenÆs Behavioral model of predisposing, enabling and
need factors that influence health care utilization was used to
investigate group differences in self-care, health responsibility,
provider problems, geographic access, and appointment availability in low
income African American and Caucasian elders. The study examined whether
these variables differentially predicted health care utilization after
controlling for health status, age, gender, financial comfort, and
education. A sample of 101 non-minority Caucasian and 103 African American
low-income elders were recruited. Data were collected using the Health
Utilization Questionnaire, the SF-36, and a seven-day daily dairy of
self-care behavior. Analysis of covariance and blocked stepwise multiple
regression analyses were performed. Caucasians were significantly older
than African Americans, yet enjoyed a greater degree of financial comfort
and better self-rated health. Compared to Caucasians, African Americans
reported significantly more problems with providers, geographic access,
and appointment availability as well as greater personal health
responsibility, but they did not differ in the degree to which they
utilized health care or engaged in self-care. Health status and level of
self-care were significant predictors of health care utilization for
African Americans, while health status and age were significant predictors
for Caucasians. Study findings suggest that health disparity among African
Americans is more from problems with health care and how it is delivered,
rather than from the amount of health care that is being utilized. As
health care providers, nurses need to respond to African AmericanÆs
dissatisfaction with their providers and promote policies to improve
geographic access and appointment availability for low income African
American elders.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparative Study of Health Care Disparity in Low Income African American and Caucasian Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158456-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparative Study of Health Care Disparity in Low Income African American and Caucasian Elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Aroian, Karen, PhD, MS, BS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3135776251</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aroian@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jillon S. Vander Wal, PhD, Assistant Professor; Rosalind Peters, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; and Nutrena Tate, MSN, Pre-doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">African Americans have the highest morbidity and mortality rates of <br/> all American racial and ethnic groups, yet are reported to utilize health <br/> care less often than non-minority Caucasians. Understanding reasons for <br/> low utilization of health care has promise for reducing these health <br/> disparities. Andersen&AElig;s Behavioral model of predisposing, enabling and <br/> need factors that influence health care utilization was used to <br/> investigate group differences in self-care, health responsibility, <br/> provider problems, geographic access, and appointment availability in low <br/> income African American and Caucasian elders. The study examined whether <br/> these variables differentially predicted health care utilization after <br/> controlling for health status, age, gender, financial comfort, and <br/> education. A sample of 101 non-minority Caucasian and 103 African American <br/> low-income elders were recruited. Data were collected using the Health <br/> Utilization Questionnaire, the SF-36, and a seven-day daily dairy of <br/> self-care behavior. Analysis of covariance and blocked stepwise multiple <br/> regression analyses were performed. Caucasians were significantly older <br/> than African Americans, yet enjoyed a greater degree of financial comfort <br/> and better self-rated health. Compared to Caucasians, African Americans <br/> reported significantly more problems with providers, geographic access, <br/> and appointment availability as well as greater personal health <br/> responsibility, but they did not differ in the degree to which they <br/> utilized health care or engaged in self-care. Health status and level of <br/> self-care were significant predictors of health care utilization for <br/> African Americans, while health status and age were significant predictors <br/> for Caucasians. Study findings suggest that health disparity among African <br/> Americans is more from problems with health care and how it is delivered, <br/> rather than from the amount of health care that is being utilized. As <br/> health care providers, nurses need to respond to African American&AElig;s <br/> dissatisfaction with their providers and promote policies to improve <br/> geographic access and appointment availability for low income African <br/> American elders.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:04:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:04:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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