Use of Genetic Algorithms to Examine Gender Bias in Emergency Department Nurses Triage Decisions for Acute Coronary Syndromes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158457
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Genetic Algorithms to Examine Gender Bias in Emergency Department Nurses Triage Decisions for Acute Coronary Syndromes
Abstract:
Use of Genetic Algorithms to Examine Gender Bias in Emergency Department Nurses Triage Decisions for Acute Coronary Syndromes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia, PhD, MSN, BSN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734.647.0182
Comprehensive strategies are needed to improve awareness, recognition,
and treatment for acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Because rapid therapy
can improve the unfavorable prognosis of individuals with ACS, it is
critical that nurses accurately associate the cues of ACS and quickly and
aggressively initiate interventional strategies that reduce mortality. Few
studies have examined the decision making process of emergency nurses,
even though nurses triage decisions often determine initial patient
priority and urgency status for emergency evaluation and treatment.
Purpose: To develop a genetic algorithm (GA) to examine gender bias in
emergency department nurses triage decisions for ACS.
Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The theoretical framework is a synthesis
of Hammond's lens model (1964) and Evans' (1984) two-stage reasoning
process. Subjects: Emergency department registered nurses (N=840) who
belong to the Emergency Nurses Association and triage patients for
complaints suggestive of ACS. Method: Subjects completed a computer
generated vignette with randomized symptoms suggestive or not suggestive
of ACS and randomly selected patient characteristics of sex, age, and
race. Two GA were then constructed. The first, constructed on the female
vignette patients, was tested for sensitivity and specificity separately
for both the female and male vignette patients. The second, constructed
using only male vignette patients, was similarly tested. A total of 500
chromosomes with a maximum of 50 genes each were randomly constructed and
tested. Bootstrapping was used to prevent overfitting. A total of 500
generations were used. After each generation, the survivors underwent
selection, mutation, and crossover to produce each subsequent generation.
Results/Conclusions: Nurses used different symptoms to evaluate male and
female vignette patients for ACS. Despite this, the two GA had similar
sensitivities and specificities. Results indicate that nurses do not agree
on the symptoms that constitute ACS and that ED nurses triage decisions do
not exhibit gender bias in ACS evaluation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Genetic Algorithms to Examine Gender Bias in Emergency Department Nurses Triage Decisions for Acute Coronary Syndromesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158457-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of Genetic Algorithms to Examine Gender Bias in Emergency Department Nurses Triage Decisions for Acute Coronary Syndromes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia, PhD, MSN, BSN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.647.0182</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmae@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Comprehensive strategies are needed to improve awareness, recognition, <br/> and treatment for acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Because rapid therapy <br/> can improve the unfavorable prognosis of individuals with ACS, it is <br/> critical that nurses accurately associate the cues of ACS and quickly and <br/> aggressively initiate interventional strategies that reduce mortality. Few <br/> studies have examined the decision making process of emergency nurses, <br/> even though nurses triage decisions often determine initial patient <br/> priority and urgency status for emergency evaluation and treatment. <br/> Purpose: To develop a genetic algorithm (GA) to examine gender bias in <br/> emergency department nurses triage decisions for ACS. <br/> Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The theoretical framework is a synthesis <br/> of Hammond's lens model (1964) and Evans' (1984) two-stage reasoning <br/> process. Subjects: Emergency department registered nurses (N=840) who <br/> belong to the Emergency Nurses Association and triage patients for <br/> complaints suggestive of ACS. Method: Subjects completed a computer <br/> generated vignette with randomized symptoms suggestive or not suggestive <br/> of ACS and randomly selected patient characteristics of sex, age, and <br/> race. Two GA were then constructed. The first, constructed on the female <br/> vignette patients, was tested for sensitivity and specificity separately <br/> for both the female and male vignette patients. The second, constructed <br/> using only male vignette patients, was similarly tested. A total of 500 <br/> chromosomes with a maximum of 50 genes each were randomly constructed and <br/> tested. Bootstrapping was used to prevent overfitting. A total of 500 <br/> generations were used. After each generation, the survivors underwent <br/> selection, mutation, and crossover to produce each subsequent generation. <br/> Results/Conclusions: Nurses used different symptoms to evaluate male and <br/> female vignette patients for ACS. Despite this, the two GA had similar <br/> sensitivities and specificities. Results indicate that nurses do not agree <br/> on the symptoms that constitute ACS and that ED nurses triage decisions do <br/> not exhibit gender bias in ACS evaluation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:04:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:04:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.