A Descriptive Study of Elderly Nuns, Hearing Impairment, and the Incidence of Falls. A Secondary Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158458
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Descriptive Study of Elderly Nuns, Hearing Impairment, and the Incidence of Falls. A Secondary Analysis
Abstract:
A Descriptive Study of Elderly Nuns, Hearing Impairment, and the Incidence of Falls. A Secondary Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Bender, Theresa, Linical Manager, Co-Presenter and Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University
Title:Clinical Manager
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 20416 W. Ridge Avenue, Galesville, WI, 54630, USA
Contact Telephone:608-582-4962
Co-Authors:Donna Kamann, Co-PI
Despite the vast literature discussing the consequences of hearing loss and the risk factors associated with falls, there is little known about the association between hearing impairment and occurrence of falls. Using a secondary analysis of the primary epidemiological longitudinal study of religious sisters conducted by Bautch & Gaspar (2003), this study examines the incidence of falls, prevalence of hearing loss, and the association of these variables. A conceptual map (developed from a concept analysis) that indicated the possible negative association of hearing and falls guides the study. A sample of 95 sisters living in 2 religious communities in the Midwestern United States meet the inclusion criteria of being over 65 years of age with hearing and fall data available. For the primary study, falls were assessed using a self-completed questionnaire and hearing was assessed using the Welch Allyn 3 Audioscope. A loss of frequency at 500, 1000, or 2000 HZ was considered to be a hearing impairment. The incidence of self-reported falls in one year was 35.8%. The prevalence of hearing impairment (untreated) was 41.1%. In addition, 27.4% had a known hearing impairment that was corrected with hearing aides. There was no difference in the occurrence of falls between subjects who did not have impaired hearing, had a hearing loss, or wore a hearing aide (CC=.006, p=.812). The incidence of falls is at a level similar to that reported in the literature. The level of hearing loss is higher than reported in the literature, indicating hearing screening is needed to improve quality of life. Continued investigation into the association between falls and hearing impairment is necessary to guide nursing interventions aimed at decreasing falls in the elderly.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Descriptive Study of Elderly Nuns, Hearing Impairment, and the Incidence of Falls. A Secondary Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158458-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Descriptive Study of Elderly Nuns, Hearing Impairment, and the Incidence of Falls. A Secondary Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bender, Theresa, Linical Manager, Co-Presenter and Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 20416 W. Ridge Avenue, Galesville, WI, 54630, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-582-4962</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">TMBender0606@webmail.winona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Donna Kamann, Co-PI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite the vast literature discussing the consequences of hearing loss and the risk factors associated with falls, there is little known about the association between hearing impairment and occurrence of falls. Using a secondary analysis of the primary epidemiological longitudinal study of religious sisters conducted by Bautch &amp; Gaspar (2003), this study examines the incidence of falls, prevalence of hearing loss, and the association of these variables. A conceptual map (developed from a concept analysis) that indicated the possible negative association of hearing and falls guides the study. A sample of 95 sisters living in 2 religious communities in the Midwestern United States meet the inclusion criteria of being over 65 years of age with hearing and fall data available. For the primary study, falls were assessed using a self-completed questionnaire and hearing was assessed using the Welch Allyn 3 Audioscope. A loss of frequency at 500, 1000, or 2000 HZ was considered to be a hearing impairment. The incidence of self-reported falls in one year was 35.8%. The prevalence of hearing impairment (untreated) was 41.1%. In addition, 27.4% had a known hearing impairment that was corrected with hearing aides. There was no difference in the occurrence of falls between subjects who did not have impaired hearing, had a hearing loss, or wore a hearing aide (CC=.006, p=.812). The incidence of falls is at a level similar to that reported in the literature. The level of hearing loss is higher than reported in the literature, indicating hearing screening is needed to improve quality of life. Continued investigation into the association between falls and hearing impairment is necessary to guide nursing interventions aimed at decreasing falls in the elderly.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:04:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:04:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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