2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158459
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Experiences of Caring for Crying Infants among Recent African Immigrants
Abstract:
Experiences of Caring for Crying Infants among Recent African Immigrants
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Bleah, Doris
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:Family Health Nursing, 10816 Tooley Court Apt. 1 F, Indianapolis, IN, 46234, USA
Contact Telephone:317-362-9737
Co-Authors:Marsha Ellett, Associate Professor
Problem: Infant colic is prolonged, intense, and persistent crying in a healthy infant. Approximately 20% of all infants in developed countries have colic. Research in developing countries has shown that infants who have been constantly carried by their mothers cry very little. Carrying an infant on the back of an adult is a common practice in developing countries. These women return to work soon after having a baby. Many of these women are migrating to developed countries and having babies. The purpose of this study was to determine what happened to infant crying among recent African immigrant mothers whose infants were born in the United States. Design and Methodology: A qualitative descriptive study was done. Eight mothers who reported that their infants cried a lot were interviewed. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The researcher asked 13 open-ended questions. The mothers were also encouraged to provide other helpful information. Analysis: The interviews were analyzed using the method of content analysis. Mothers reported that infants cried on average 97.5 minutes per day. Mothers reported feeling stress when they had to work outside the home. Findings included: (a) mothers continued to carry their infants, (b) mothers responded promptly to their infants' crying, (c) mothers felt sad when their infants cried, (d) mothers breastfed ad lib, and (e) infants slept with their mothers at night. In other words, African mothers were always actively trying to prevent their infant's crying from escalating. Relevance to Nursing: Although some crying occurred in these infants, it was not as much as typically occurs in a colicky infant; however, education is needed because these mothers were stressed by this crying, especially those who had to work outside the home. If American mothers were to adopt the practices of African mothers, possibly infant colic could be decreased.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExperiences of Caring for Crying Infants among Recent African Immigrantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158459-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Experiences of Caring for Crying Infants among Recent African Immigrants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bleah, Doris</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Family Health Nursing, 10816 Tooley Court Apt. 1 F, Indianapolis, IN, 46234, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317-362-9737</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dbleah@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marsha Ellett, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Infant colic is prolonged, intense, and persistent crying in a healthy infant. Approximately 20% of all infants in developed countries have colic. Research in developing countries has shown that infants who have been constantly carried by their mothers cry very little. Carrying an infant on the back of an adult is a common practice in developing countries. These women return to work soon after having a baby. Many of these women are migrating to developed countries and having babies. The purpose of this study was to determine what happened to infant crying among recent African immigrant mothers whose infants were born in the United States. Design and Methodology: A qualitative descriptive study was done. Eight mothers who reported that their infants cried a lot were interviewed. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The researcher asked 13 open-ended questions. The mothers were also encouraged to provide other helpful information. Analysis: The interviews were analyzed using the method of content analysis. Mothers reported that infants cried on average 97.5 minutes per day. Mothers reported feeling stress when they had to work outside the home. Findings included: (a) mothers continued to carry their infants, (b) mothers responded promptly to their infants' crying, (c) mothers felt sad when their infants cried, (d) mothers breastfed ad lib, and (e) infants slept with their mothers at night. In other words, African mothers were always actively trying to prevent their infant's crying from escalating. Relevance to Nursing: Although some crying occurred in these infants, it was not as much as typically occurs in a colicky infant; however, education is needed because these mothers were stressed by this crying, especially those who had to work outside the home. If American mothers were to adopt the practices of African mothers, possibly infant colic could be decreased.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:04:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:04:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.