The Effects of Educational Preparedness and Life Experiences on Nursing Students' Perceptions of End-of-Life Decision Making

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158460
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Educational Preparedness and Life Experiences on Nursing Students' Perceptions of End-of-Life Decision Making
Abstract:
The Effects of Educational Preparedness and Life Experiences on Nursing Students' Perceptions of End-of-Life Decision Making
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Browning, Teresa
P.I. Institution Name:Spalding University
Contact Address:College of Health Sciences, 11904 Rock Spring Drive, Louisville, KY, 40245, USA
Contact Telephone:502-641-1411
Co-Authors:Toby Kubas and Mechelle Randell
Problem: Caring for the dying can be a particularly emotionally demanding task for nursing care. Training and preparation are paramount to nursesÆ survival and success within this area of nursing. If nurses are to serve their patients well, education and an understanding of the emotional needs at the End-of-Life are necessary. Purpose: One, to identify the experiential basis for End-of-Life decision making skills of student nurses, and to identify the educational needs of student nurses to achieve a competent level of preparation for practice. Method: A phenomenological study was designed and rich descriptive data pertaining to students' experiences and perceptions of End-of-Life was obtained from a homogeneous sample of nursing students from a private Southern University . Saturation was achieved and Max Van Manen's method of line by line coding was used to uncover thematic aspects of the lived experience of student nurses'. A multiple choice, open-ended, and scenario based questionnaire was developed. Research Findings: First, religious beliefs are used as an experiential basis for decision making. Second, respect for patient autonomy. Third, provision of comfort. And Fourth, the need for information delivery to the patient to insure informed decision making.
Practice Implications: Nurses must be confident and comfortable communicating honestly and openly with patients and their families. Results of this study clearly indicate the need for increased educational opportunities dedicated to the care of the "dying" patient. These results echo statements from Matzo (2002) and Loftus (1998), that a nurses' sensitivity and preparedness is essential to for patients to achieve a "good" death. Faculty Advisors: Gracie Wishnia, PhD, MSN, RN C and Pam White, MSN, RN (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Educational Preparedness and Life Experiences on Nursing Students' Perceptions of End-of-Life Decision Makingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158460-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Educational Preparedness and Life Experiences on Nursing Students' Perceptions of End-of-Life Decision Making</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Browning, Teresa</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Spalding University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Health Sciences, 11904 Rock Spring Drive, Louisville, KY, 40245, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">502-641-1411</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sho1008061@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Toby Kubas and Mechelle Randell</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Caring for the dying can be a particularly emotionally demanding task for nursing care. Training and preparation are paramount to nurses&AElig; survival and success within this area of nursing. If nurses are to serve their patients well, education and an understanding of the emotional needs at the End-of-Life are necessary. Purpose: One, to identify the experiential basis for End-of-Life decision making skills of student nurses, and to identify the educational needs of student nurses to achieve a competent level of preparation for practice. Method: A phenomenological study was designed and rich descriptive data pertaining to students' experiences and perceptions of End-of-Life was obtained from a homogeneous sample of nursing students from a private Southern University . Saturation was achieved and Max Van Manen's method of line by line coding was used to uncover thematic aspects of the lived experience of student nurses'. A multiple choice, open-ended, and scenario based questionnaire was developed. Research Findings: First, religious beliefs are used as an experiential basis for decision making. Second, respect for patient autonomy. Third, provision of comfort. And Fourth, the need for information delivery to the patient to insure informed decision making. <br/>Practice Implications: Nurses must be confident and comfortable communicating honestly and openly with patients and their families. Results of this study clearly indicate the need for increased educational opportunities dedicated to the care of the &quot;dying&quot; patient. These results echo statements from Matzo (2002) and Loftus (1998), that a nurses' sensitivity and preparedness is essential to for patients to achieve a &quot;good&quot; death. Faculty Advisors: Gracie Wishnia, PhD, MSN, RN C and Pam White, MSN, RN (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:04:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:04:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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