Comparison of Child and Parent Perceptions about Ambulatory Pediatric Sub-specialty Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158464
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Child and Parent Perceptions about Ambulatory Pediatric Sub-specialty Care
Abstract:
Comparison of Child and Parent Perceptions about Ambulatory Pediatric Sub-specialty Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Chesney, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 308 Harvard Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-624-8965
Co-Authors:Linda Lindeke, Laurne Johnson, Angela Jukkala, and Sandra Lynch
Perceptions about satisfaction with health care are rarely solicited from children and adolescents, despite developmental and ethical implications suggesting they may have much to say about the clinic experience. This study's purpose was to compare children's and adolescents' perceptions about their outpatient sub-specialty care to opinions given by their parents. Method: This descriptive, comparative survey design study employed a convenience sample of children and adolescents (n=116), receiving care at two metropolitan pediatric sub-specialty clinics, and their parents (n=115). Data were obtained from a survey instrument previously developed for in-patient use (Lindeke & Johnson, in review). Additionally, three open-ended questions were solicited regarding best and worst aspects of care. Results: Although there was moderate significant correlation between child-teen and parent scores, parent ratings demonstrated significantly higher levels of satisfaction as compared to child-teen ratings. Responses to open-ended questions revealed childrenÆs and teens' opinions varied from parentsÆ opinions regarding the best and worst aspects of the clinic experience. Children and teens most frequently identified the friendly, respectful, and caring environment as the best part of the experience, a finding which differed from parents' top issue of clinical competence. Children and teens described fear of pain or actual pain to be the worst aspect of clinic visits; parents identified the long waiting time during visits as the worst aspect. Discussion: Despite overall positive data, important negative and positive aspects of the care experience were clearly identified through use of open-ended questions, suggesting that open-ended questions may increase the usefulness of survey tools to inform change and develop policies within the clinic setting. Findings further suggest current health care practices of having parents serve as proxies in evaluating pediatric ambulatory care may not accurately represent views of children and teens. Findings support children's and teens' ability to provide input into care improvement processes. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Child and Parent Perceptions about Ambulatory Pediatric Sub-specialty Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158464-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Child and Parent Perceptions about Ambulatory Pediatric Sub-specialty Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chesney, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 308 Harvard Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-624-8965</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chesn009@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda Lindeke, Laurne Johnson, Angela Jukkala, and Sandra Lynch</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Perceptions about satisfaction with health care are rarely solicited from children and adolescents, despite developmental and ethical implications suggesting they may have much to say about the clinic experience. This study's purpose was to compare children's and adolescents' perceptions about their outpatient sub-specialty care to opinions given by their parents. Method: This descriptive, comparative survey design study employed a convenience sample of children and adolescents (n=116), receiving care at two metropolitan pediatric sub-specialty clinics, and their parents (n=115). Data were obtained from a survey instrument previously developed for in-patient use (Lindeke &amp; Johnson, in review). Additionally, three open-ended questions were solicited regarding best and worst aspects of care. Results: Although there was moderate significant correlation between child-teen and parent scores, parent ratings demonstrated significantly higher levels of satisfaction as compared to child-teen ratings. Responses to open-ended questions revealed children&AElig;s and teens' opinions varied from parents&AElig; opinions regarding the best and worst aspects of the clinic experience. Children and teens most frequently identified the friendly, respectful, and caring environment as the best part of the experience, a finding which differed from parents' top issue of clinical competence. Children and teens described fear of pain or actual pain to be the worst aspect of clinic visits; parents identified the long waiting time during visits as the worst aspect. Discussion: Despite overall positive data, important negative and positive aspects of the care experience were clearly identified through use of open-ended questions, suggesting that open-ended questions may increase the usefulness of survey tools to inform change and develop policies within the clinic setting. Findings further suggest current health care practices of having parents serve as proxies in evaluating pediatric ambulatory care may not accurately represent views of children and teens. Findings support children's and teens' ability to provide input into care improvement processes. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:04:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:04:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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