Assessing Cognitive Function Prior to Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158465
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing Cognitive Function Prior to Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)
Abstract:
Assessing Cognitive Function Prior to Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Cimprich, Bernadine, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls Room 2172, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734-6470193
Co-Authors:Barbara Therrien, PhD; Patricia Reuter-Lorenz, PhD; Daniel F. Hayes, MD; Douglas Noll, PhD; Daniel Normolle, PhD; Robert Welsh, PhD; Patricia Clark, MS; Catherine Vincent, PhD; James Nelson, PhDc
Cognitive impairment is a common side effect of adjuvant chemotherapy
for breast cancer having detrimental effects on daily functioning and the
quality of survivorship. Despite the reported frequency of cognitive
dysfunction associated with chemotherapy, the underlying brain mechanisms
are not well understood. Two basic cognitive processes, attention and
working memory, are considered important prerequisites for effective
cognitive functioning in daily life. The purpose of this pilot study was
to determine the feasibility of using functional magnetic resonance
imaging (fMRI), a powerful noninvasive tool, to assess brain activation
patterns related to attention and working memory in women newly diagnosed
with breast cancer. Seven women (30 - 61 yrs old) with early stage (I or
II) breast cancer were tested with an established Verbal Working Memory
Task (VMT) during fMRI prior to the start of adjuvant chemotherapy, and
seven healthy female controls (31 - 64 yrs old) were tested after a
negative screening mammogram. Accuracy for the breast cancer group was 88%
- 98%, and for controls, 92%-97%. The breast cancer group had
significantly (p <. 05) slower reaction times in the demanding conditions
of the task. Image analysis showed differences in brain activation
patterns between the breast cancer and control groups. Controls showed
expected activation in the medial frontal cortex (MFC). In contrast, the
breast cancer group showed increased activity not only in the MFC but also
in other components of the attention/working memory circuitry in both
hemispheres, suggesting recruitment of additional brain areas in order to
perform the task. These early behavioral and imaging findings show a trend
of slowed performance and vulnerability in attention and working memory
systems in middle age women with breast cancer prior to any adjuvant
chemotherapy. Overall, the study demonstrates that fMRI can provide
specific information about alterations in cognitive function in women
diagnosed with breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing Cognitive Function Prior to Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158465-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing Cognitive Function Prior to Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cimprich, Bernadine, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls Room 2172, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-6470193</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cimprich@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Therrien, PhD; Patricia Reuter-Lorenz, PhD; Daniel F. Hayes, MD; Douglas Noll, PhD; Daniel Normolle, PhD; Robert Welsh, PhD; Patricia Clark, MS; Catherine Vincent, PhD; James Nelson, PhDc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cognitive impairment is a common side effect of adjuvant chemotherapy <br/> for breast cancer having detrimental effects on daily functioning and the <br/> quality of survivorship. Despite the reported frequency of cognitive <br/> dysfunction associated with chemotherapy, the underlying brain mechanisms <br/> are not well understood. Two basic cognitive processes, attention and <br/> working memory, are considered important prerequisites for effective <br/> cognitive functioning in daily life. The purpose of this pilot study was <br/> to determine the feasibility of using functional magnetic resonance <br/> imaging (fMRI), a powerful noninvasive tool, to assess brain activation <br/> patterns related to attention and working memory in women newly diagnosed <br/> with breast cancer. Seven women (30 - 61 yrs old) with early stage (I or <br/> II) breast cancer were tested with an established Verbal Working Memory <br/> Task (VMT) during fMRI prior to the start of adjuvant chemotherapy, and <br/> seven healthy female controls (31 - 64 yrs old) were tested after a <br/> negative screening mammogram. Accuracy for the breast cancer group was 88% <br/> - 98%, and for controls, 92%-97%. The breast cancer group had <br/> significantly (p &lt;. 05) slower reaction times in the demanding conditions <br/> of the task. Image analysis showed differences in brain activation <br/> patterns between the breast cancer and control groups. Controls showed <br/> expected activation in the medial frontal cortex (MFC). In contrast, the <br/> breast cancer group showed increased activity not only in the MFC but also <br/> in other components of the attention/working memory circuitry in both <br/> hemispheres, suggesting recruitment of additional brain areas in order to <br/> perform the task. These early behavioral and imaging findings show a trend <br/> of slowed performance and vulnerability in attention and working memory <br/> systems in middle age women with breast cancer prior to any adjuvant <br/> chemotherapy. Overall, the study demonstrates that fMRI can provide <br/> specific information about alterations in cognitive function in women <br/> diagnosed with breast cancer.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:04:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:04:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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