2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158470
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Survivors in motion
Abstract:
Survivors in motion
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Finnegan, Lorna, PhD, APN, CNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-1668
Young adult survivors of childhood cancer are at risk for late effects
of their cancer treatments that may accelerate the development and
progression of diseases associated with aging, such as hypertension,
diabetes, coronary artery disease, and second cancers. Some late effects
could be ameliorated by increased physical activity.
The purpose of this descriptive, cross-sectional pilot study is to examine
the feasibility of using pedometers and web-based physical activity (PA)
logs to measure a seven-day period of physical activity in 50 young
adults, who are survivors of childhood cancer. The specific aims are
threefold: determine acceptability and completeness of PA log and
pedometer data; describe daily patterns and types of physical activities;
and examine relationships between pedometer step counts and self-reported
minutes spent in daily physical activities.
Young adult survivors are recruited through the internet and from
long-term survivor clinics. Participants wear pedometers, record daily
physical activities using web-based PA logs, and respond to questions
regarding acceptability of the web-based PA logs and pedometers.
Descriptive statistics will be computed for the acceptability questions,
pedometer removal times/reasons, missing PA log data, pedometer step
counts, and PA log minutes/day spent in different types of physical
activities. Correlations will be used to calculate associations between
mean daily step counts and the PA log minutes/day for resting/light,
moderate, and hard/very hard activities.
The results will be used to refine the instruments and survey methodology
for subsequent intervention studies, which will test the effectiveness of
a computerized tailored physical activity program. Given the continuing
upward trend in childhood cancer survival, it is likely that nurses will
see increasing numbers of these survivors in the primary care arena.
Computerized tailored physical activity interventions can be used as a
tool to augment nursing practice, with the potential to impact the health
of large groups of cancer survivors.
This study is supported by a 2004 MNRS Seed Grant Award.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSurvivors in motionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158470-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Survivors in motion</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Finnegan, Lorna, PhD, APN, CNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-1668</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lornaf@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Young adult survivors of childhood cancer are at risk for late effects <br/> of their cancer treatments that may accelerate the development and <br/> progression of diseases associated with aging, such as hypertension, <br/> diabetes, coronary artery disease, and second cancers. Some late effects <br/> could be ameliorated by increased physical activity. <br/> The purpose of this descriptive, cross-sectional pilot study is to examine <br/> the feasibility of using pedometers and web-based physical activity (PA) <br/> logs to measure a seven-day period of physical activity in 50 young <br/> adults, who are survivors of childhood cancer. The specific aims are <br/> threefold: determine acceptability and completeness of PA log and <br/> pedometer data; describe daily patterns and types of physical activities; <br/> and examine relationships between pedometer step counts and self-reported <br/> minutes spent in daily physical activities.<br/> Young adult survivors are recruited through the internet and from <br/> long-term survivor clinics. Participants wear pedometers, record daily <br/> physical activities using web-based PA logs, and respond to questions <br/> regarding acceptability of the web-based PA logs and pedometers. <br/> Descriptive statistics will be computed for the acceptability questions, <br/> pedometer removal times/reasons, missing PA log data, pedometer step <br/> counts, and PA log minutes/day spent in different types of physical <br/> activities. Correlations will be used to calculate associations between <br/> mean daily step counts and the PA log minutes/day for resting/light, <br/> moderate, and hard/very hard activities.<br/> The results will be used to refine the instruments and survey methodology <br/> for subsequent intervention studies, which will test the effectiveness of <br/> a computerized tailored physical activity program. Given the continuing <br/> upward trend in childhood cancer survival, it is likely that nurses will <br/> see increasing numbers of these survivors in the primary care arena. <br/> Computerized tailored physical activity interventions can be used as a <br/> tool to augment nursing practice, with the potential to impact the health <br/> of large groups of cancer survivors. <br/> This study is supported by a 2004 MNRS Seed Grant Award.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:05:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:05:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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