2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158471
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain Management Outcomes of Healing Touch Interventions
Abstract:
Pain Management Outcomes of Healing Touch Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Fouladbakhsh, Judith, MSN, APRN, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Research Scientist
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 2464 N. Fairview Lane, Rochester Hills, MI, MI, 48306, USA
Contact Telephone:248-651-1645
Co-Authors:Sue Berney, MA, BA, Manager and Rosalind Peters, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor
Forty-two percent of Americans experience pain on a daily basis, and
as many as 76% seek relief through complementary/alternative therapies
(CAT). Yet little is known about the outcomes of CAT interventions. The
purpose of this ongoing, funded research is to identify outcomes of
Healing Touch (HT) interventions for the treatment of chronic and acute
pain in non-hospitalized clients The theoretical framework guiding this
study is an emerging mid-range theory of CAT use derived from Andersen's
Behavioral Model of Health Service Use (1969, 1995). Pain is
conceptualized as a perceived need factor influencing use of CAT as a
health service. Healing Touch is conceptualized as a CAT for pain
management that uses touch and energy balancing techniques. Method: A
descriptive-correlational design is used to conduct a secondary analysis
of HT outcomes. The sample consists of 425 patient records, with data
representing 839 HT interventions that were performed in a HT clinic from
2000-2002. The key research question addressed is whether there is a
significant difference in self-reported pain pre and post HT intervention.
Plans for data analysis include calculation of descriptive statistics to
provide information about the characteristics of the patients, level of
practitioner, type of pain, and location of blocked energy flow.
Comparisons of mean scores will determine significance of changes in pain
level. Correlational statistics and repeated measures analysis will be
computed for the sub-group of clients with multiple treatment occasions.
Nursing implications: Since nurses are intimately involved in pain
control, it is important for them to have increased awareness of the
prevalence of CAT use by people in pain, as well as information regarding
outcomes of HT for pain relief. Results of this study will provide data to
guide future intervention research on the effects of HT as a treatment
modality for pain management.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain Management Outcomes of Healing Touch Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158471-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pain Management Outcomes of Healing Touch Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fouladbakhsh, Judith, MSN, APRN, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Research Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 2464 N. Fairview Lane, Rochester Hills, MI, MI, 48306, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">248-651-1645</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aa1565@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sue Berney, MA, BA, Manager and Rosalind Peters, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Forty-two percent of Americans experience pain on a daily basis, and <br/> as many as 76% seek relief through complementary/alternative therapies <br/> (CAT). Yet little is known about the outcomes of CAT interventions. The <br/> purpose of this ongoing, funded research is to identify outcomes of <br/> Healing Touch (HT) interventions for the treatment of chronic and acute <br/> pain in non-hospitalized clients The theoretical framework guiding this <br/> study is an emerging mid-range theory of CAT use derived from Andersen's <br/> Behavioral Model of Health Service Use (1969, 1995). Pain is <br/> conceptualized as a perceived need factor influencing use of CAT as a <br/> health service. Healing Touch is conceptualized as a CAT for pain <br/> management that uses touch and energy balancing techniques. Method: A <br/> descriptive-correlational design is used to conduct a secondary analysis <br/> of HT outcomes. The sample consists of 425 patient records, with data <br/> representing 839 HT interventions that were performed in a HT clinic from <br/> 2000-2002. The key research question addressed is whether there is a <br/> significant difference in self-reported pain pre and post HT intervention. <br/> Plans for data analysis include calculation of descriptive statistics to <br/> provide information about the characteristics of the patients, level of <br/> practitioner, type of pain, and location of blocked energy flow. <br/> Comparisons of mean scores will determine significance of changes in pain <br/> level. Correlational statistics and repeated measures analysis will be <br/> computed for the sub-group of clients with multiple treatment occasions. <br/> Nursing implications: Since nurses are intimately involved in pain <br/> control, it is important for them to have increased awareness of the <br/> prevalence of CAT use by people in pain, as well as information regarding <br/> outcomes of HT for pain relief. Results of this study will provide data to <br/> guide future intervention research on the effects of HT as a treatment <br/> modality for pain management.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:05:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:05:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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