2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158472
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Illness Representations in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure
Abstract:
Illness Representations in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Fowler, Christopher, PhDc, RN, ACNP
P.I. Institution Name:Methodist Dallas Medical Center
Title:Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:The Liver Institute, 221 W. Colorado Blvd., Suite #535, Dallas, TX, 75208, USA
Contact Telephone:214-947-4450
Co-Authors:Linda Baas, PhD, RN, ACNP, CCNS, Professor
The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) was designed to
measure the cognitive and emotional perceptions associated with illness as
defined by Leventhal in the Common Sense Model (CSM). This model explains
coping strategies based on 5 components: 1) identity of the illness and
symptoms, 2) belief about cause of the illness, 3) timeline of illness, 4)
consequences of the illness, and 5) controllability or cure of the
illness. For each of the five components, the person develops perceptions
based on cognitive and emotional schemas. The IPQ-R has been used in many
populations with chronic disease, but not in a United States population
with renal disease. The purposes of this study were: 1) to evaluate the
reliability of the IPQ-R in a sample of persons undergoing hemodialysis,
and 2) to examine the relationship between illness perceptions and
well-being. A convenience sample of 42 subjects was recruited from two
dialysis centers. All subjects had hemodialysis scheduled at least twice
per week. Ages ranged from 35 to 88 years (mean=63.5, sd=13.7). The sample
was 50% male. Anonymity was maintained as subjects completed the IPQ-R and
the Index of Well-Being (IWB). Cronbach alpha reliability coefficients
were calculated for each of the subscales of the IPQ-R and the IWB. All
subscales demonstrated adequate reliability (alpha >.70) with the
exception of the treatment control subscale of the IPQ-R (alpha=.46).
Subscales of the IPQ-R were correlated with the IWB. Both the perceived
consequences subscale (p<.05) and emotional representations subscale
(p<.01) were negatively correlated with well-being. Results of this study
indicate that the IPQ-R is useful as a tool to measure illness perceptions
in persons undergoing hemodialysis except for the treatment control
subscale. Further study of the CSM focusing on factors that patients use
to manage the consequences and the emotional representations may result in
improved well-being.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIllness Representations in Patients with Chronic Renal Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158472-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Illness Representations in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fowler, Christopher, PhDc, RN, ACNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Methodist Dallas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">The Liver Institute, 221 W. Colorado Blvd., Suite #535, Dallas, TX, 75208, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">214-947-4450</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">christopher.fowler@sbcglobal.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda Baas, PhD, RN, ACNP, CCNS, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) was designed to <br/> measure the cognitive and emotional perceptions associated with illness as <br/> defined by Leventhal in the Common Sense Model (CSM). This model explains <br/> coping strategies based on 5 components: 1) identity of the illness and <br/> symptoms, 2) belief about cause of the illness, 3) timeline of illness, 4) <br/> consequences of the illness, and 5) controllability or cure of the <br/> illness. For each of the five components, the person develops perceptions <br/> based on cognitive and emotional schemas. The IPQ-R has been used in many <br/> populations with chronic disease, but not in a United States population <br/> with renal disease. The purposes of this study were: 1) to evaluate the <br/> reliability of the IPQ-R in a sample of persons undergoing hemodialysis, <br/> and 2) to examine the relationship between illness perceptions and <br/> well-being. A convenience sample of 42 subjects was recruited from two <br/> dialysis centers. All subjects had hemodialysis scheduled at least twice <br/> per week. Ages ranged from 35 to 88 years (mean=63.5, sd=13.7). The sample <br/> was 50% male. Anonymity was maintained as subjects completed the IPQ-R and <br/> the Index of Well-Being (IWB). Cronbach alpha reliability coefficients <br/> were calculated for each of the subscales of the IPQ-R and the IWB. All <br/> subscales demonstrated adequate reliability (alpha &gt;.70) with the <br/> exception of the treatment control subscale of the IPQ-R (alpha=.46). <br/> Subscales of the IPQ-R were correlated with the IWB. Both the perceived <br/> consequences subscale (p&lt;.05) and emotional representations subscale <br/> (p&lt;.01) were negatively correlated with well-being. Results of this study <br/> indicate that the IPQ-R is useful as a tool to measure illness perceptions <br/> in persons undergoing hemodialysis except for the treatment control <br/> subscale. Further study of the CSM focusing on factors that patients use <br/> to manage the consequences and the emotional representations may result in <br/> improved well-being.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:05:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:05:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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