Measuring confidence in critical thinking ability and perceived self-efficacy in nursing students: The relationship

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158474
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring confidence in critical thinking ability and perceived self-efficacy in nursing students: The relationship
Abstract:
Measuring confidence in critical thinking ability and perceived self-efficacy in nursing students: The relationship
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Fox, Diane, MSN, BSN, BA, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Eastern Michigan University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 311 Marshall Building, Ypsilanti, MI, 48197, USA
Contact Telephone:734-487-4512
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between
perceived self-efficacy and confidence in critical thinking ability in
Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) students. Positively perceived
self-efficacy is an important determinant of the attaining of critical
thinking skills. Design: A non-experimental, descriptive-correlational
design was used. This work is the first to relate the disposition
subscale, confidence in critical thinking ability and perceived
self-efficacy. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: A conceptual framework
was developed for this study. Facione's definition of the Affective
dispositions are responsible for a significant portion of critical
thinking in nursing students. affective disposition of confidence in
critical thinking and BanduraÆs conceptual definition of self-efficacy
were used. Understanding the human experience, as described by Heidegger,
and Benner's five stages of knowledge acquisition were utilized in the
formation of the conceptual framework. The conceptual framework developed
a circuitous process of confidence in critical thinking ability,
self-efficacy, and the self-interpreting human being experience. Subjects:
The subjects (N=82) were first semester nursing students in an ADN
program. Method: Three instruments were used in the research. The
California Critical Thinking Dispositions Inventory (CCTDI), the
Generalized Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale (GPSS), and a researcher
designed demographic questionnaire. Results: Correlations and analysis
supported a relationship between perceived self-efficacy and the subscale
disposition confidence in critical thinking ability (r=0.321; p=0.003).
Conclusions: The modest correlation indicates that there is a relationship
between perceived self-efficacy and confidence in critical thinking
ability. Improvement in the design tools for assessment of confidence in
critical thinking ability is strongly recommended. From the data gathered
in this study, one might conclude that perceived self-efficacy could be a
general test to be included in assessing dispositions toward critical
thinking.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring confidence in critical thinking ability and perceived self-efficacy in nursing students: The relationshipen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158474-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring confidence in critical thinking ability and perceived self-efficacy in nursing students: The relationship</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fox, Diane, MSN, BSN, BA, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Eastern Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 311 Marshall Building, Ypsilanti, MI, 48197, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-487-4512</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dfox2@emich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between <br/> perceived self-efficacy and confidence in critical thinking ability in <br/> Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) students. Positively perceived <br/> self-efficacy is an important determinant of the attaining of critical <br/> thinking skills. Design: A non-experimental, descriptive-correlational <br/> design was used. This work is the first to relate the disposition <br/> subscale, confidence in critical thinking ability and perceived <br/> self-efficacy. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: A conceptual framework <br/> was developed for this study. Facione's definition of the Affective <br/> dispositions are responsible for a significant portion of critical <br/> thinking in nursing students. affective disposition of confidence in <br/> critical thinking and Bandura&AElig;s conceptual definition of self-efficacy <br/> were used. Understanding the human experience, as described by Heidegger, <br/> and Benner's five stages of knowledge acquisition were utilized in the <br/> formation of the conceptual framework. The conceptual framework developed <br/> a circuitous process of confidence in critical thinking ability, <br/> self-efficacy, and the self-interpreting human being experience. Subjects: <br/> The subjects (N=82) were first semester nursing students in an ADN <br/> program. Method: Three instruments were used in the research. The <br/> California Critical Thinking Dispositions Inventory (CCTDI), the <br/> Generalized Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale (GPSS), and a researcher <br/> designed demographic questionnaire. Results: Correlations and analysis <br/> supported a relationship between perceived self-efficacy and the subscale <br/> disposition confidence in critical thinking ability (r=0.321; p=0.003). <br/> Conclusions: The modest correlation indicates that there is a relationship <br/> between perceived self-efficacy and confidence in critical thinking <br/> ability. Improvement in the design tools for assessment of confidence in <br/> critical thinking ability is strongly recommended. From the data gathered <br/> in this study, one might conclude that perceived self-efficacy could be a <br/> general test to be included in assessing dispositions toward critical <br/> thinking.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:05:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:05:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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