Predictors of Favorable Self-Reported Health Outcomes Among Rural Southern African American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158475
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Favorable Self-Reported Health Outcomes Among Rural Southern African American Women
Abstract:
Predictors of Favorable Self-Reported Health Outcomes Among Rural Southern African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Gary, Faye, EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-5240
Co-Authors:Hossein Yarandi, PhD
Research has documented the continued improvement of health and well
being among Americans, but this trend has not yet included ethnic minority
populations such as African American women. Compared to their Caucasian
counterpart, many Rural African American women have limited access to
health care, lack adequate information about health-related conditions,
live in a perpetual state of illness, and have higher rates of early
mortality. The dynamics of these and other complex phenomena that create
health disparities need to be unraveled. The purpose of this
descriptive/correlational study is to determine the factors that predict
favorable health outcomes for rural Southern African women. Using a survey
descriptive approach, rural African America women (n=206) between the ages
of 40- 60 years were invited to participate in a one-hour face-to-face
structured interview. Research measures included adapted version of the
Patient Satisfaction With Health Care Decisions, Life Stress
Questionnaire, and People in Your Life Questionnaire. The Beck Depression
Inventory was also administered. Participants were recruited from
churches, community-based organizations, community centers, and worksites.
Research related information was read aloud to the participants to
diminish the need to query them about their reading levels. Women who
self-reported a favorable health status were more educated, had higher
incomes, and demonstrated higher scores in health knowledge and decision
making. Women who were unemployed and who reported more frequent stressors
in their lives experienced higher odds of having poorer health.
Importantly, having health insurance was not associated with better health
status. Significant predictors of a favorable health status were
environmental factors that contributed to a sense of autonomy. Maintaining
predictors of a favorable health status for rural Southern African
American women necessitates the development of culture-specific
interventions addressing health disparities. Recommendations include
additional research with larger samples and the validation of the womenÆs
health status by primary care providers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Favorable Self-Reported Health Outcomes Among Rural Southern African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158475-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Favorable Self-Reported Health Outcomes Among Rural Southern African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gary, Faye, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-5240</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fgary@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hossein Yarandi, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research has documented the continued improvement of health and well <br/> being among Americans, but this trend has not yet included ethnic minority <br/> populations such as African American women. Compared to their Caucasian <br/> counterpart, many Rural African American women have limited access to <br/> health care, lack adequate information about health-related conditions, <br/> live in a perpetual state of illness, and have higher rates of early <br/> mortality. The dynamics of these and other complex phenomena that create <br/> health disparities need to be unraveled. The purpose of this <br/> descriptive/correlational study is to determine the factors that predict <br/> favorable health outcomes for rural Southern African women. Using a survey <br/> descriptive approach, rural African America women (n=206) between the ages <br/> of 40- 60 years were invited to participate in a one-hour face-to-face <br/> structured interview. Research measures included adapted version of the <br/> Patient Satisfaction With Health Care Decisions, Life Stress <br/> Questionnaire, and People in Your Life Questionnaire. The Beck Depression <br/> Inventory was also administered. Participants were recruited from <br/> churches, community-based organizations, community centers, and worksites. <br/> Research related information was read aloud to the participants to <br/> diminish the need to query them about their reading levels. Women who <br/> self-reported a favorable health status were more educated, had higher <br/> incomes, and demonstrated higher scores in health knowledge and decision <br/> making. Women who were unemployed and who reported more frequent stressors <br/> in their lives experienced higher odds of having poorer health. <br/> Importantly, having health insurance was not associated with better health <br/> status. Significant predictors of a favorable health status were <br/> environmental factors that contributed to a sense of autonomy. Maintaining <br/> predictors of a favorable health status for rural Southern African <br/> American women necessitates the development of culture-specific <br/> interventions addressing health disparities. Recommendations include <br/> additional research with larger samples and the validation of the women&AElig;s <br/> health status by primary care providers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:05:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:05:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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