2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158479
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Early Stage Dementia: The Care-Recipient's Perspective
Abstract:
Early Stage Dementia: The Care-Recipient's Perspective
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kirk, Laura, MS, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 6-101 Weaver Densford Hall, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-928-3001
The movement towards earlier diagnosis of dementia provides, in
theory, the opportunity for the impaired person to play an active role in
decision making and planning for the future. However, little is known
about the experience of the person with dementia as the care-recipient has
been virtually ignored in dementia research. It seems likely that the
perspectives and concerns of persons living with dementia differ
substantially from those of their family caregivers. Thus, the purpose of
this study was to examine the perceptions of persons in the earliest stage
of a dementing disorder.
We conducted semi-structured interviews with care-recipients who took part
in a NINR-funded intervention study for dementia caregivers. Participants
responded to open-ended questions about their experiences since they began
having memory problems. Qualitative methods were used to identify themes
from the responses of 30 care-recipients who had a diagnosis of
progressive dementia and an MMSE score of 25 or above.
Care-recipients were mostly male (67%), ranging in age from 54 to 91 with
a mean of 77.8 years. The majority of the care-recipients were married
(60%), with their spouse being the primary caregiver.
Findings to date suggest a nearly unanimous recognition of short-term
memory loss, particularly in the areas of forgetting names and misplacing
objects. Care-recipients spoke of feelings of loss and dissatisfaction
with the way things were going, but the majority attributed the cause of
their dissatisfaction to aging as opposed to a progressive disease
process. Many respondents expressed appreciation for the effort and
support provided by the primary caregiver and acknowledged that their
memory problems had affected their relationships with others. In order to
tailor interventions to the needs of this rapidly expanding population,
nurses must acquire a better understanding of the early-stage dementia
experience from the perspective of the care-recipient.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEarly Stage Dementia: The Care-Recipient's Perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158479-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Early Stage Dementia: The Care-Recipient's Perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kirk, Laura, MS, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 6-101 Weaver Densford Hall, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-928-3001</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kirk0013@umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The movement towards earlier diagnosis of dementia provides, in <br/> theory, the opportunity for the impaired person to play an active role in <br/> decision making and planning for the future. However, little is known <br/> about the experience of the person with dementia as the care-recipient has <br/> been virtually ignored in dementia research. It seems likely that the <br/> perspectives and concerns of persons living with dementia differ <br/> substantially from those of their family caregivers. Thus, the purpose of <br/> this study was to examine the perceptions of persons in the earliest stage <br/> of a dementing disorder. <br/> We conducted semi-structured interviews with care-recipients who took part <br/> in a NINR-funded intervention study for dementia caregivers. Participants <br/> responded to open-ended questions about their experiences since they began <br/> having memory problems. Qualitative methods were used to identify themes <br/> from the responses of 30 care-recipients who had a diagnosis of <br/> progressive dementia and an MMSE score of 25 or above. <br/> Care-recipients were mostly male (67%), ranging in age from 54 to 91 with <br/> a mean of 77.8 years. The majority of the care-recipients were married <br/> (60%), with their spouse being the primary caregiver. <br/> Findings to date suggest a nearly unanimous recognition of short-term <br/> memory loss, particularly in the areas of forgetting names and misplacing <br/> objects. Care-recipients spoke of feelings of loss and dissatisfaction <br/> with the way things were going, but the majority attributed the cause of <br/> their dissatisfaction to aging as opposed to a progressive disease <br/> process. Many respondents expressed appreciation for the effort and <br/> support provided by the primary caregiver and acknowledged that their <br/> memory problems had affected their relationships with others. In order to <br/> tailor interventions to the needs of this rapidly expanding population, <br/> nurses must acquire a better understanding of the early-stage dementia <br/> experience from the perspective of the care-recipient.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:05:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:05:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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