The Relationships of Self-efficacy, Depression and Risky Sexual Behavior in Adolescents With Sexual Experiences

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158482
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationships of Self-efficacy, Depression and Risky Sexual Behavior in Adolescents With Sexual Experiences
Abstract:
The Relationships of Self-efficacy, Depression and Risky Sexual Behavior in Adolescents With Sexual Experiences
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lee, Yi-Hui, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Principal Investigator
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1929 Green Road #607, Cleveland, OH, 44121, USA
Contact Telephone:216-692-7333
Co-Authors:Ali Salman, PhDc, ND, MD, RN, Principal Investigator
Background and significance: Increasing rates of HIV/AIDS infections
among youth draws attention to the needs for emphasizing the reduction of
risky sexual behavior, a major contributor to the spread of HIV/AIDS.
Studies indicated that depressed adolescents may manifest lower
self-efficacy to avoiding risky sexual behavior, and people with higher
self-efficacy may be less likely to engage in risky sexual behavior.
However, few researchers have examined the relationship between
self-efficacy and depression and adolescent risky sexual behavior. The
insufficient understanding limits nurses' ability to provide effective
programs for reducing adolescents' risky sexual behaviors. Purpose and
method: This cross-sectional correlational descriptive study, using
Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory as theoretical framework, was designed to
examine the relationships among the variables. One hundred and sixty-nine
(girls=90, boy=79) Taiwanese high school students who were 16-18 year-old
and had ever have sexual intercourse experience were recruited and asked
to complete the reliable and valid questionnaires. Results: Girls had
significantly higher self-efficacy, higher depression scores, and less
risky sexual behaviors than boys. While two important intervening
variables, substance use and age, were controlled as covariates,
self-efficacy had a negative relationship with risky sexual behaviors in
both girls and boys. Only among girls, self-efficacy demonstrated a
significant negative relationship with depression. Both girls and boys,
with higher depression scores were not found to engage in more risky
sexual behaviors. Conclusion: This study suggests that the relationship of
depression to self-efficacy should be considered while developing a
program to enhance self-efficacy for preventing risky sexual behavior in
female adolescents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationships of Self-efficacy, Depression and Risky Sexual Behavior in Adolescents With Sexual Experiencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158482-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationships of Self-efficacy, Depression and Risky Sexual Behavior in Adolescents With Sexual Experiences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Yi-Hui, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1929 Green Road #607, Cleveland, OH, 44121, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-692-7333</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yxl78@cwru.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ali Salman, PhDc, ND, MD, RN, Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and significance: Increasing rates of HIV/AIDS infections <br/> among youth draws attention to the needs for emphasizing the reduction of <br/> risky sexual behavior, a major contributor to the spread of HIV/AIDS. <br/> Studies indicated that depressed adolescents may manifest lower <br/> self-efficacy to avoiding risky sexual behavior, and people with higher <br/> self-efficacy may be less likely to engage in risky sexual behavior. <br/> However, few researchers have examined the relationship between <br/> self-efficacy and depression and adolescent risky sexual behavior. The <br/> insufficient understanding limits nurses' ability to provide effective <br/> programs for reducing adolescents' risky sexual behaviors. Purpose and <br/> method: This cross-sectional correlational descriptive study, using <br/> Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory as theoretical framework, was designed to <br/> examine the relationships among the variables. One hundred and sixty-nine <br/> (girls=90, boy=79) Taiwanese high school students who were 16-18 year-old <br/> and had ever have sexual intercourse experience were recruited and asked <br/> to complete the reliable and valid questionnaires. Results: Girls had <br/> significantly higher self-efficacy, higher depression scores, and less <br/> risky sexual behaviors than boys. While two important intervening <br/> variables, substance use and age, were controlled as covariates, <br/> self-efficacy had a negative relationship with risky sexual behaviors in <br/> both girls and boys. Only among girls, self-efficacy demonstrated a <br/> significant negative relationship with depression. Both girls and boys, <br/> with higher depression scores were not found to engage in more risky <br/> sexual behaviors. Conclusion: This study suggests that the relationship of <br/> depression to self-efficacy should be considered while developing a <br/> program to enhance self-efficacy for preventing risky sexual behavior in <br/> female adolescents.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:05:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:05:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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