2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158483
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Philanthropy Embedded in a Community Health Nursing Course: Student Outcomes
Abstract:
Philanthropy Embedded in a Community Health Nursing Course: Student Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lovell, Mariann, PhD, MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, P.O. Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:(513) 558-5230
Co-Authors:Roberta Lee, MSN, MPH, RN, Assistant Professor and Beverly Tillman, MSN, BSN, RN, Instructor
Problem: Many of today's complex health problems may profitably be
addressed through approaches that emphasize collaboration with
communities. Results-oriented philanthropy is one approach that combines
student knowledge and action to decrease health disparities. Curricula
often overlook the importance of philanthropic activities. The role of
educational organizations in engaging and encouraging future community
leaders is key to the early involvement of students.
The purpose of this descriptive study was: increase studentsÆ knowledge
and skill related to philanthropy and community investment; increase
student awareness of the importance of nonprofit agencies in serving the
community; establish 'connectedness' between students and the nonprofit
sector.
Anderson and McFarlane's Community-as-Partner model was the organizing
framework for the study. Method: Philanthropy and community investment
were used as vehicles to apply course concepts. Each of three student
groups functioned as a community board, interacting with public and
private nonprofit agencies to assess their community, prioritize problems,
develop, distribute and evaluate RFPs. A $12,000 grant from the Health
Foundation of Greater Cincinnati provided students with an opportunity to
make a real improvement in the health of their communities by
competitively awarding up to $4,000 each to a non-profit organization that
addressed the identified health problem.
The convenience sample consisted of 23 students (age 20 through 26) who
enrolled in three sections of the senior Community Practicum course. A
17-item questionnaire using a Likert scale was given to study participants
at three different points in time: the first and last days of the quarter
and 16 months after graduation. A pretest-posttest design was used to
measure student knowledge, attitudes and involvement in philanthropic
activities. The findings showed a sustained increase in knowledge of
philanthropy across the measures as well as positive attitudes and an
increase in involvement in philanthropic activities. Results indicate the
importance of embedding philanthropy in nursing curricula.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhilanthropy Embedded in a Community Health Nursing Course: Student Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158483-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Philanthropy Embedded in a Community Health Nursing Course: Student Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lovell, Mariann, PhD, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, P.O. Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(513) 558-5230</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Mariann.Lovell@uc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Roberta Lee, MSN, MPH, RN, Assistant Professor and Beverly Tillman, MSN, BSN, RN, Instructor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Many of today's complex health problems may profitably be <br/> addressed through approaches that emphasize collaboration with <br/> communities. Results-oriented philanthropy is one approach that combines <br/> student knowledge and action to decrease health disparities. Curricula <br/> often overlook the importance of philanthropic activities. The role of <br/> educational organizations in engaging and encouraging future community <br/> leaders is key to the early involvement of students. <br/> The purpose of this descriptive study was: increase students&AElig; knowledge <br/> and skill related to philanthropy and community investment; increase <br/> student awareness of the importance of nonprofit agencies in serving the <br/> community; establish 'connectedness' between students and the nonprofit <br/> sector.<br/> Anderson and McFarlane's Community-as-Partner model was the organizing <br/> framework for the study. Method: Philanthropy and community investment <br/> were used as vehicles to apply course concepts. Each of three student <br/> groups functioned as a community board, interacting with public and <br/> private nonprofit agencies to assess their community, prioritize problems, <br/> develop, distribute and evaluate RFPs. A $12,000 grant from the Health <br/> Foundation of Greater Cincinnati provided students with an opportunity to <br/> make a real improvement in the health of their communities by <br/> competitively awarding up to $4,000 each to a non-profit organization that <br/> addressed the identified health problem.<br/> The convenience sample consisted of 23 students (age 20 through 26) who <br/> enrolled in three sections of the senior Community Practicum course. A <br/> 17-item questionnaire using a Likert scale was given to study participants <br/> at three different points in time: the first and last days of the quarter <br/> and 16 months after graduation. A pretest-posttest design was used to <br/> measure student knowledge, attitudes and involvement in philanthropic <br/> activities. The findings showed a sustained increase in knowledge of <br/> philanthropy across the measures as well as positive attitudes and an <br/> increase in involvement in philanthropic activities. Results indicate the <br/> importance of embedding philanthropy in nursing curricula.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:05:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:05:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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