2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158486
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Research Evidence about Breastfeeding Infants with Special Needs
Abstract:
Research Evidence about Breastfeeding Infants with Special Needs
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:McCain, Gail, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-5979
Infants with special needs related to breastfeeding (BF) include those
with a congenital heart defect (CHD), cleft defect, or hypotonia/Down
syndrome. These conditions comprise the most common birth defects (CHD 8
in 1,000 births, cleft defects 1 in 700 births, and Down syndrome 1 in 800
births). These conditions all interfere with sucking ability and the
consequence is poor growth. Infants with cleft defects and Down syndrome
are at risk for otitis media and middle ear effusion, and infants with CHD
and Down syndrome are at risk for respiratory infections. Thus, the unique
properties of human milk related to digestibility and immunologic
protection have added value for these infants. In addition, BF promotes a
special closeness between mother and infant that may enhance attachment in
situations where the diagnosis of a defect is shocking and stressful.
Searches of Cinahl and Medline from 1994 to 2004 were done to locate
research on BF for infants with these conditions. There were nine studies
related to infants with CHD, twelve studies related to cleft defects, and
three studies related to hypotonia/Down syndrome. There was only one
randomized experiment that tested spoon-feeding versus BF for infants with
cleft defects immediately post-surgical repair. Wound healing and weight
gain were equivalent for infants fed by the two conditions, supporting the
safety of BF. Four quasi-experimental studies supported BF for infants
with cleft palates and CHD. The descriptive studies (15) focused on
identifying feeding problems for these infants. Studies of parental
reports (8 of the 15) described their infants' difficulties with feeding,
and decried the lack of support and information from professionals about
BF. The case studies (4), representative of all three conditions, were
testimonials written by mothers about how they accomplished BF for their
infants. Clearly there is a need for research on interventions to
facilitate BF for infants with these conditions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResearch Evidence about Breastfeeding Infants with Special Needsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158486-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Research Evidence about Breastfeeding Infants with Special Needs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCain, Gail, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-5979</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Infants with special needs related to breastfeeding (BF) include those <br/> with a congenital heart defect (CHD), cleft defect, or hypotonia/Down <br/> syndrome. These conditions comprise the most common birth defects (CHD 8 <br/> in 1,000 births, cleft defects 1 in 700 births, and Down syndrome 1 in 800 <br/> births). These conditions all interfere with sucking ability and the <br/> consequence is poor growth. Infants with cleft defects and Down syndrome <br/> are at risk for otitis media and middle ear effusion, and infants with CHD <br/> and Down syndrome are at risk for respiratory infections. Thus, the unique <br/> properties of human milk related to digestibility and immunologic <br/> protection have added value for these infants. In addition, BF promotes a <br/> special closeness between mother and infant that may enhance attachment in <br/> situations where the diagnosis of a defect is shocking and stressful. <br/> Searches of Cinahl and Medline from 1994 to 2004 were done to locate <br/> research on BF for infants with these conditions. There were nine studies <br/> related to infants with CHD, twelve studies related to cleft defects, and <br/> three studies related to hypotonia/Down syndrome. There was only one <br/> randomized experiment that tested spoon-feeding versus BF for infants with <br/> cleft defects immediately post-surgical repair. Wound healing and weight <br/> gain were equivalent for infants fed by the two conditions, supporting the <br/> safety of BF. Four quasi-experimental studies supported BF for infants <br/> with cleft palates and CHD. The descriptive studies (15) focused on <br/> identifying feeding problems for these infants. Studies of parental <br/> reports (8 of the 15) described their infants' difficulties with feeding, <br/> and decried the lack of support and information from professionals about <br/> BF. The case studies (4), representative of all three conditions, were <br/> testimonials written by mothers about how they accomplished BF for their <br/> infants. Clearly there is a need for research on interventions to <br/> facilitate BF for infants with these conditions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:06:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:06:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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