Cognitive and physical resource impact on spatial cognition in the presence of stress induced cachexia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158488
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive and physical resource impact on spatial cognition in the presence of stress induced cachexia
Abstract:
Cognitive and physical resource impact on spatial cognition in the presence of stress induced cachexia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Metzger, Bonnie, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Biobehavioral Nursing Science, 400 NIB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:(734) 763-4202
Co-Authors:Hala Darwich, RN, BSN, Predoctoral Student; Alice Davis, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Brenda Drummond, RN, MSN, APRN, Predoctoral Student; and Barbara Therrien, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor
x
We examined the effects of physical and/or cognitive frailty on
spatial learning and memory in the presence of acute stress. Female
Fisher-344 x Brown Norway rats, old aged (27-30 mos, N=10), young old
(22-25 mos, N=10) and young adults control (4-6 mos, N=4). Lean Tissue
Mass (LTM) was estimated pre and post stress. Mean swim time (ST) in
seconds and Directional Heading Error (DHE) in the Morris water maze was
measured in all animals during 4 trials /day for 8 days pre and post
stress. Aged animals were divided into four groups based on a median split
of their pre-stress LTM and ST: 1. Frail, physically and cognitively frail
(n=5), 2. PR cf: Physically Robust, cognitively frail (n=5), 3. pf CR:
physically frail, Cognitively Robust (n=5), 4. Robust, physically and
cognitively robust (n=5). On day 9 all animals received acute stress
events. Most of the older animals' response to the 1st day post stress and
platform change was significantly affected by stress. Cognitively frail
animals exhibited the greatest degree of learning difficulty initially via
a significant relationship between ST and initial DHE on Day 1 post stress
(R2=33, F=10.9, p=.003). No significant improvement in spatial performance
in older animals was noted until day 4 post stress. By day 4 post stress,
both Frail and pf CR continued to display memory impairment with initial
DHE exceeding 44 14 SEM. Baseline lean tissue mass has a significant
negative relationship (R2=24, F=6, p=0.02) with post stress cognitive
performance. Thus, while cognitive frailty has an acute effect on
post-stress cognitive performance, the impact of physical frailty is both
profound and prolonged. Funded by CERCF, CFAR, University of Michigan & NIH.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive and physical resource impact on spatial cognition in the presence of stress induced cachexiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158488-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive and physical resource impact on spatial cognition in the presence of stress induced cachexia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Metzger, Bonnie, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Biobehavioral Nursing Science, 400 NIB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(734) 763-4202</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bmetzger@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hala Darwich, RN, BSN, Predoctoral Student; Alice Davis, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Brenda Drummond, RN, MSN, APRN, Predoctoral Student; and Barbara Therrien, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor<br/>x</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">We examined the effects of physical and/or cognitive frailty on <br/> spatial learning and memory in the presence of acute stress. Female <br/> Fisher-344 x Brown Norway rats, old aged (27-30 mos, N=10), young old <br/> (22-25 mos, N=10) and young adults control (4-6 mos, N=4). Lean Tissue <br/> Mass (LTM) was estimated pre and post stress. Mean swim time (ST) in <br/> seconds and Directional Heading Error (DHE) in the Morris water maze was <br/> measured in all animals during 4 trials /day for 8 days pre and post <br/> stress. Aged animals were divided into four groups based on a median split <br/> of their pre-stress LTM and ST: 1. Frail, physically and cognitively frail <br/> (n=5), 2. PR cf: Physically Robust, cognitively frail (n=5), 3. pf CR: <br/> physically frail, Cognitively Robust (n=5), 4. Robust, physically and <br/> cognitively robust (n=5). On day 9 all animals received acute stress <br/> events. Most of the older animals' response to the 1st day post stress and <br/> platform change was significantly affected by stress. Cognitively frail <br/> animals exhibited the greatest degree of learning difficulty initially via <br/> a significant relationship between ST and initial DHE on Day 1 post stress <br/> (R2=33, F=10.9, p=.003). No significant improvement in spatial performance <br/> in older animals was noted until day 4 post stress. By day 4 post stress, <br/> both Frail and pf CR continued to display memory impairment with initial <br/> DHE exceeding 44 14 SEM. Baseline lean tissue mass has a significant <br/> negative relationship (R2=24, F=6, p=0.02) with post stress cognitive <br/> performance. Thus, while cognitive frailty has an acute effect on <br/> post-stress cognitive performance, the impact of physical frailty is both <br/> profound and prolonged. Funded by CERCF, CFAR, University of Michigan &amp; NIH.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:06:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:06:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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