2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158492
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Healing Times and HgBA1c Values for Lower Extremity Ulcers
Abstract:
Healing Times and HgBA1c Values for Lower Extremity Ulcers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Mutnansky, Melanie
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 2883E 20th Ave S, Grand Forks, ND, 58201, USA
Contact Telephone:218-791-1517
The diabetic population is at an increased risk, up to 15% over a lifetime, to develop leg and foot ulcers due to such factors as neuropathy, ischemia, and infection. While it is clear from literature review that tight glucose control may diminish these complications, the relationship between HgBA1c values and healing times of ulcers is vague. This study explored the relationship between HgBA1c's and healing times of leg and foot ulcers. Orem's (1991) Theory of Nursing was used, focusing on self-care and nursing intervention if self-care is inadequate. Forty-one male and 22 female clients were studied. Of these, 9 had Type 1 and 54 had Type 2 diabetes. The mean age was 67.7 (SD+ 14.98, range=33-94 years). The mean weight was 221.84 pounds (SD + 58.79, range=122 -402). As part of a larger study, a retrospective chart review was performed on clients served by a Midwestern outpatient wound clinic. No data required individual consent or included identifying data, thus ensuring confidentiality. IRB approval was granted. Data collectors utilized a research defined tool including demographics, medical diagnoses, wound measurements, admission HgBA1c and HgBA1c at wound closure. Statistics were generated using the SPSS program. Of the 63 ulcers, 36 healed, and 26 did not heal. Admission HgBA1c's ranged from 4.5 to 15.4 (M=8.05 + 2.29). HgBA1c's closest to ulcer closure ranged from 5.3 to 12.3 (M=7.68 + 1.81). Patients with higher HgBA1c's had ulcers that healed, but in a significantly longer period of time than those with lower HgBA1c's. A significant correlation was noted between a smoking history and an increased HgBA1c. Decreased healing times should result in lower patient costs, a decreased chance of infection, and increased quality of life. Patient education may improve self care practices resulting in better glucose control.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealing Times and HgBA1c Values for Lower Extremity Ulcersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158492-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Healing Times and HgBA1c Values for Lower Extremity Ulcers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mutnansky, Melanie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 2883E 20th Ave S, Grand Forks, ND, 58201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">218-791-1517</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">melanie.mutnansky@und.nodak.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The diabetic population is at an increased risk, up to 15% over a lifetime, to develop leg and foot ulcers due to such factors as neuropathy, ischemia, and infection. While it is clear from literature review that tight glucose control may diminish these complications, the relationship between HgBA1c values and healing times of ulcers is vague. This study explored the relationship between HgBA1c's and healing times of leg and foot ulcers. Orem's (1991) Theory of Nursing was used, focusing on self-care and nursing intervention if self-care is inadequate. Forty-one male and 22 female clients were studied. Of these, 9 had Type 1 and 54 had Type 2 diabetes. The mean age was 67.7 (SD+ 14.98, range=33-94 years). The mean weight was 221.84 pounds (SD + 58.79, range=122 -402). As part of a larger study, a retrospective chart review was performed on clients served by a Midwestern outpatient wound clinic. No data required individual consent or included identifying data, thus ensuring confidentiality. IRB approval was granted. Data collectors utilized a research defined tool including demographics, medical diagnoses, wound measurements, admission HgBA1c and HgBA1c at wound closure. Statistics were generated using the SPSS program. Of the 63 ulcers, 36 healed, and 26 did not heal. Admission HgBA1c's ranged from 4.5 to 15.4 (M=8.05 + 2.29). HgBA1c's closest to ulcer closure ranged from 5.3 to 12.3 (M=7.68 + 1.81). Patients with higher HgBA1c's had ulcers that healed, but in a significantly longer period of time than those with lower HgBA1c's. A significant correlation was noted between a smoking history and an increased HgBA1c. Decreased healing times should result in lower patient costs, a decreased chance of infection, and increased quality of life. Patient education may improve self care practices resulting in better glucose control.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:06:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:06:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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