Adaptation to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury of the Post-traumatic Brain Injured Patients in Thailand

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158493
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adaptation to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury of the Post-traumatic Brain Injured Patients in Thailand
Abstract:
Adaptation to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury of the Post-traumatic Brain Injured Patients in Thailand
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Petchprapai, Nutthita, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Research Assistant
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:(216)368-4700
Motor vehicle accident (MVA) is a major cause of death and
disabilities in Thailand. Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is the most
common consequence after MVA and there are more than 28,500 individuals
sustained MTBI annually. MTBI sequelaes such as physical, emotional and
psychological consequences cause changes in many aspects of its victims'
lives. As a result of, those consequences are considered as ôtemporary
physical symptomsö and ônon-life threatening conditionsö, MTBI patients
are usually taken care of at home and are anticipating full recovery
without rehabilitation or intervention. The studies of coping and
adaptation to MTBI in Thailand receive very few attentions and there is no
study about the ability to function and quality of life after MTBI yet.
The purposes of this investigation are to determine level of adaptation to
MTBI, to provide empirical support of the Roy adaptation model in MTBI
patients within Thai context, and to define the predictors of adaptation.
A predictive research design will be utilized. MTBI patients who are
followed up at the tertiary hospitals will be interviewed. A
nonprobability convenience sample of 200 adults, 15 years of age or older,
with a history of MTBI will be included. Demographic data, level of
consciousness, post-traumatic amnesia period, time postinjury,
postconcussion symptoms, and perceived social support will be collected as
the stimuli for adaptation. Ways of coping and perceived stress will be
evaluated as the process of adaptation. Adaptive and maladaptive behaviors
will be measured by using social integration questionnaire, the SF-36 for
quality of life and the CES-D for depression.
Descriptive statistic will be performed to determine level of adaptation
to MTBI. Logistic regression and multiple regression will be used to find
the predictors of adaptation to MTBI. The best model to predict adaptation
in MTBI patients will be explored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdaptation to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury of the Post-traumatic Brain Injured Patients in Thailanden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158493-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adaptation to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury of the Post-traumatic Brain Injured Patients in Thailand</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Petchprapai, Nutthita, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(216)368-4700</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nutthita@case.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Motor vehicle accident (MVA) is a major cause of death and <br/> disabilities in Thailand. Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is the most <br/> common consequence after MVA and there are more than 28,500 individuals <br/> sustained MTBI annually. MTBI sequelaes such as physical, emotional and <br/> psychological consequences cause changes in many aspects of its victims' <br/> lives. As a result of, those consequences are considered as &ocirc;temporary <br/> physical symptoms&ouml; and &ocirc;non-life threatening conditions&ouml;, MTBI patients <br/> are usually taken care of at home and are anticipating full recovery <br/> without rehabilitation or intervention. The studies of coping and <br/> adaptation to MTBI in Thailand receive very few attentions and there is no <br/> study about the ability to function and quality of life after MTBI yet. <br/> The purposes of this investigation are to determine level of adaptation to <br/> MTBI, to provide empirical support of the Roy adaptation model in MTBI <br/> patients within Thai context, and to define the predictors of adaptation. <br/> A predictive research design will be utilized. MTBI patients who are <br/> followed up at the tertiary hospitals will be interviewed. A <br/> nonprobability convenience sample of 200 adults, 15 years of age or older, <br/> with a history of MTBI will be included. Demographic data, level of <br/> consciousness, post-traumatic amnesia period, time postinjury, <br/> postconcussion symptoms, and perceived social support will be collected as <br/> the stimuli for adaptation. Ways of coping and perceived stress will be <br/> evaluated as the process of adaptation. Adaptive and maladaptive behaviors <br/> will be measured by using social integration questionnaire, the SF-36 for <br/> quality of life and the CES-D for depression.<br/> Descriptive statistic will be performed to determine level of adaptation <br/> to MTBI. Logistic regression and multiple regression will be used to find <br/> the predictors of adaptation to MTBI. The best model to predict adaptation <br/> in MTBI patients will be explored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:06:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:06:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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