Promoting Physical Activity and Nutritional Behaviors in Ethnically-Diverse, Low-Income Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158494
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Promoting Physical Activity and Nutritional Behaviors in Ethnically-Diverse, Low-Income Patients
Abstract:
Promoting Physical Activity and Nutritional Behaviors in Ethnically-Diverse, Low-Income Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Plonczynski, Donna J., PhD, APN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Illinois University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1240 Normal Rd, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA
Contact Telephone:815.753.6584
Co-Authors:Sally P. Lundeen, FAAN, RN, Dean; Laura M. Anderko, PhD, RN, Associate Dean; and Claudia Bartz, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor
Problem. Sedentary lifestyles and poor nutritional intake are
significant contributors to the prevalence of obesity, heart disease, and
diabetes. Prevalence rates of these chronic diseases are higher in
ethnically-diverse, low-income communities. Community-based, tailored
approaches are indicated to transfer research on behavior change into
practice. This paper presents the results of a physical activity and
nutritional intervention study across eight nursing centers of the Midwest
Nursing Centers Consortium Research Network. Framework. The Health Belief
Model in concert with Lundeen's Nursing Center Model framed the study.
Subjects. After IRB approval, adult patients presenting for non-acute
illnesses at a participating nursing center were recruited if they were at
risk for chronic disease according to Healthy People 2010. Patients were
included in the study if they had controlled BP and normal urinalysis,
regardless of their BMI. Method. A cross-sectional research design was
used for this study that was provided in English or Spanish. Video
teleconferences were used to maintain continuity between sites.
Interventions that were both culturally and educationally appropriate
followed a 16-week course titled, "Wellness for a Lifetime," which
included health buddies, support groups, organized walking, and
presentations. Weekly evaluations of health behaviors were conducted.
Results. Preliminary results found that subjects were predominantly women
(84%) with an age range between 40-83 years. The ethnic distribution was
diverse with Caucasian (48%), African American (39%), Hispanic (11%), and
Native American (1%) participants. Of the 121 patients that signed
consents, 82 subjects started the program. A further 21 patients withdrew
during the study for an overall attrition rate of 50%. Further data
analysis is underway. Conclusion. Tailored, community-based interventions
are predicted to improve health behaviors in high-risk, ethnically diverse
patients of nursing centers. The successful completion of a Practice-Based
Research Network study is significant for its outreach to underserved
communities across geographical locations. Funded: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePromoting Physical Activity and Nutritional Behaviors in Ethnically-Diverse, Low-Income Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158494-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Promoting Physical Activity and Nutritional Behaviors in Ethnically-Diverse, Low-Income Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Plonczynski, Donna J., PhD, APN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Illinois University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1240 Normal Rd, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">815.753.6584</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">djplonz@niu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sally P. Lundeen, FAAN, RN, Dean; Laura M. Anderko, PhD, RN, Associate Dean; and Claudia Bartz, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem. Sedentary lifestyles and poor nutritional intake are <br/> significant contributors to the prevalence of obesity, heart disease, and <br/> diabetes. Prevalence rates of these chronic diseases are higher in <br/> ethnically-diverse, low-income communities. Community-based, tailored <br/> approaches are indicated to transfer research on behavior change into <br/> practice. This paper presents the results of a physical activity and <br/> nutritional intervention study across eight nursing centers of the Midwest <br/> Nursing Centers Consortium Research Network. Framework. The Health Belief <br/> Model in concert with Lundeen's Nursing Center Model framed the study. <br/> Subjects. After IRB approval, adult patients presenting for non-acute <br/> illnesses at a participating nursing center were recruited if they were at <br/> risk for chronic disease according to Healthy People 2010. Patients were <br/> included in the study if they had controlled BP and normal urinalysis, <br/> regardless of their BMI. Method. A cross-sectional research design was <br/> used for this study that was provided in English or Spanish. Video <br/> teleconferences were used to maintain continuity between sites. <br/> Interventions that were both culturally and educationally appropriate <br/> followed a 16-week course titled, &quot;Wellness for a Lifetime,&quot; which <br/> included health buddies, support groups, organized walking, and <br/> presentations. Weekly evaluations of health behaviors were conducted. <br/> Results. Preliminary results found that subjects were predominantly women <br/> (84%) with an age range between 40-83 years. The ethnic distribution was <br/> diverse with Caucasian (48%), African American (39%), Hispanic (11%), and <br/> Native American (1%) participants. Of the 121 patients that signed <br/> consents, 82 subjects started the program. A further 21 patients withdrew <br/> during the study for an overall attrition rate of 50%. Further data <br/> analysis is underway. Conclusion. Tailored, community-based interventions <br/> are predicted to improve health behaviors in high-risk, ethnically diverse <br/> patients of nursing centers. The successful completion of a Practice-Based <br/> Research Network study is significant for its outreach to underserved <br/> communities across geographical locations. Funded: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:06:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:06:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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