2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158498
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Psychometric Analysis
Abstract:
Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Psychometric Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Reuille, Kristina, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Pre-doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:Center for Nursing Research, 4965-7 Potomac Square Way, Indianapolis, IN, 46268, USA
Contact Telephone:317-295-0083
Co-Authors:Janet S. Carpenter, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Fatigue is a well-known, distressing side-effect of cancer treatment
that persists for some cancer survivors. Existing fatigue measures may be
problematic in that they may (1) not characterize psychological and
physical aspects of fatigue and (2) suffer from ceiling or floor effects,
particularly when used among cancer survivors. The purpose of this study
was to analyze the psychometric properties of various fatigue measures in
breast cancer survivors (BCS) including content validity, internal
consistency reliability, and construct validity. Psychometric theory and
the Common Sense Model guided the analysis.
The sample included 70 BCS (Mean age=51; SD=9) participating in a
randomized clinical trial testing a medication to treat hot flashes.
Participants were married (75%), employed (74%), Caucasian (88%), taking
tamoxifen (47%) and 35 (SD=41; median 20) months post-treatment.
Fatigue measures included: 1) F_POMS-sf; 2) Piper Fatigue Scale); 3)
Circumplex Octant 6 (low activation, negative affect), and 4) the MOS-SF36
Vitality subscale. Construct validation measures included: 1) CES-D; 2)
STAI; 3) PANAS; 4) Ham-D; 5) MOS-SF36 subscales; 6) Marlowe-Crowne Social
Desirability Scale (MCSDS) and 7) the PSQI.
Content validity: All fatigue measures address physical qualities and
intensity of fatigue, however, only 2 addressed psychological qualities
and only 1 addressed fatigue duration and distress. Reliability:
Cronbach's alphas were acceptable (.77 to .96). Construct validity:
Fatigue measures were moderately to highly correlated (.52 to .80).
Relationships among fatigue measures and with construct validation
variables (discriminant, known groups) were as expected. However, measures
suffered from ceiling or floor effects.
Findings suggest new measures of fatigue, such as the Cancer
Treatment-Related Fatigue Representation Scale (CTRFRep) should (1)
address all dimensions of fatigue and (2) be evaluated for ceiling/floor
effects. Findings can guide the selection of fatigue measures in future
studies of breast cancer survivors.
Supported by NINR/NIH grants #R01 NR05261; F31NR008834-01A1 and PHS grant
#5T32NR07066.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Psychometric Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158498-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Psychometric Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reuille, Kristina, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Pre-doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Center for Nursing Research, 4965-7 Potomac Square Way, Indianapolis, IN, 46268, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317-295-0083</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kreuille@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janet S. Carpenter, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Fatigue is a well-known, distressing side-effect of cancer treatment <br/> that persists for some cancer survivors. Existing fatigue measures may be <br/> problematic in that they may (1) not characterize psychological and <br/> physical aspects of fatigue and (2) suffer from ceiling or floor effects, <br/> particularly when used among cancer survivors. The purpose of this study <br/> was to analyze the psychometric properties of various fatigue measures in <br/> breast cancer survivors (BCS) including content validity, internal <br/> consistency reliability, and construct validity. Psychometric theory and <br/> the Common Sense Model guided the analysis.<br/> The sample included 70 BCS (Mean age=51; SD=9) participating in a <br/> randomized clinical trial testing a medication to treat hot flashes. <br/> Participants were married (75%), employed (74%), Caucasian (88%), taking <br/> tamoxifen (47%) and 35 (SD=41; median 20) months post-treatment.<br/> Fatigue measures included: 1) F_POMS-sf; 2) Piper Fatigue Scale); 3) <br/> Circumplex Octant 6 (low activation, negative affect), and 4) the MOS-SF36 <br/> Vitality subscale. Construct validation measures included: 1) CES-D; 2) <br/> STAI; 3) PANAS; 4) Ham-D; 5) MOS-SF36 subscales; 6) Marlowe-Crowne Social <br/> Desirability Scale (MCSDS) and 7) the PSQI.<br/> Content validity: All fatigue measures address physical qualities and <br/> intensity of fatigue, however, only 2 addressed psychological qualities <br/> and only 1 addressed fatigue duration and distress. Reliability: <br/> Cronbach's alphas were acceptable (.77 to .96). Construct validity: <br/> Fatigue measures were moderately to highly correlated (.52 to .80). <br/> Relationships among fatigue measures and with construct validation <br/> variables (discriminant, known groups) were as expected. However, measures <br/> suffered from ceiling or floor effects.<br/> Findings suggest new measures of fatigue, such as the Cancer <br/> Treatment-Related Fatigue Representation Scale (CTRFRep) should (1) <br/> address all dimensions of fatigue and (2) be evaluated for ceiling/floor <br/> effects. Findings can guide the selection of fatigue measures in future <br/> studies of breast cancer survivors. <br/> Supported by NINR/NIH grants #R01 NR05261; F31NR008834-01A1 and PHS grant <br/> #5T32NR07066.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:06:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:06:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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