Autonomic Nervous System Function and Sleep/Wake Patterns in Women with Fibromyalgia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158501
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Autonomic Nervous System Function and Sleep/Wake Patterns in Women with Fibromyalgia
Abstract:
Autonomic Nervous System Function and Sleep/Wake Patterns in Women with Fibromyalgia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Robinson, F. Patrick, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Medical-Surgical Nursing, 845 S. Damen (M/C 802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-8217
Co-Authors:Joan L. Shaver, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean and Joellen Wilbur, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean for Research
Fibromyalgia (FM), affecting between 4 -12 million people, mostly
women, has been profiled as a 'stress-related' functional disorder with
observed stress physiology components such as: 1) blunting of the
hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress hormone axis such as low 24-hour
blood levels of free cortisol, and a weak cortisol response to
administered ACTH or CRH; 2) postural change abnormalities, implying
autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction; and 3) reported and recorded
sleep abnormalities. The purpose of this descriptive comparative study was
to describe differences in 1) ANS function from 24-hour heart rate
variability indicators (HRV) and 2) sleep/wake patterns from 24-hour
sleep/wake actigraphy indicators. Methods included using ambulatory,
non-invasive, biobehavioral measures and comparing women with FM (n=18,
mean age=48 yrs) and women without FM (n=20, mean age 41yrs). All subjects
were sedentary and postmenopausal or in the mid-follicular stage of the
menstrual cycle. Results validated that the women with FM compared to
without FM had significantly higher myalgic scores (p=<0.001) and lower
HRV (SDNN, p=0.042; SDANN, p=.028) with a dominant sympathetic HRV
frequency component (p=0.49). Differences between groups on sleep/waking
actigraphy indicators were not evident. These results indicate that women
with FM tend to have altered autonomic regulation of their heart rate that
could predispose them over time to cardiovascular problems. Although they
perceive poor sleep, this is not validated by use of actigraphy. These
data are suggestive that women with FM might benefit from stress reduction
interventions to reset the ANS.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAutonomic Nervous System Function and Sleep/Wake Patterns in Women with Fibromyalgiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158501-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Autonomic Nervous System Function and Sleep/Wake Patterns in Women with Fibromyalgia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robinson, F. Patrick, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical-Surgical Nursing, 845 S. Damen (M/C 802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-8217</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">prphd@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joan L. Shaver, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean and Joellen Wilbur, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Fibromyalgia (FM), affecting between 4 -12 million people, mostly <br/> women, has been profiled as a 'stress-related' functional disorder with <br/> observed stress physiology components such as: 1) blunting of the <br/> hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress hormone axis such as low 24-hour <br/> blood levels of free cortisol, and a weak cortisol response to <br/> administered ACTH or CRH; 2) postural change abnormalities, implying <br/> autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction; and 3) reported and recorded <br/> sleep abnormalities. The purpose of this descriptive comparative study was <br/> to describe differences in 1) ANS function from 24-hour heart rate <br/> variability indicators (HRV) and 2) sleep/wake patterns from 24-hour <br/> sleep/wake actigraphy indicators. Methods included using ambulatory, <br/> non-invasive, biobehavioral measures and comparing women with FM (n=18, <br/> mean age=48 yrs) and women without FM (n=20, mean age 41yrs). All subjects <br/> were sedentary and postmenopausal or in the mid-follicular stage of the <br/> menstrual cycle. Results validated that the women with FM compared to <br/> without FM had significantly higher myalgic scores (p=&lt;0.001) and lower <br/> HRV (SDNN, p=0.042; SDANN, p=.028) with a dominant sympathetic HRV <br/> frequency component (p=0.49). Differences between groups on sleep/waking <br/> actigraphy indicators were not evident. These results indicate that women <br/> with FM tend to have altered autonomic regulation of their heart rate that <br/> could predispose them over time to cardiovascular problems. Although they <br/> perceive poor sleep, this is not validated by use of actigraphy. These <br/> data are suggestive that women with FM might benefit from stress reduction <br/> interventions to reset the ANS.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:07:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:07:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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