2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158502
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Validity of the EDI-II for Assessing Eating Disordered Attitudes and Behaviors
Abstract:
Validity of the EDI-II for Assessing Eating Disordered Attitudes and Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Sargent, Judy, MS, CS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48103, USA
Contact Telephone:(734) 332-8995
Co-Authors:Karen F. Stein, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor
The Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI-II) is a widely used measure of
eating disordered attitudes and behaviors that is used to evaluate
treatment success in eating disorder (ED) intervention studies. However,
attitudes (affective judgments) and behaviors (observable activities) are
discrete concepts that have been conceptually blurred in this work. A
large body of research has shown that attitudes are not synonymous with,
nor do they reliably predict behavior (Eagly & Chaiken, 1998). An analysis
of the four main EDI-II subscales (Ineffectiveness [IE], Body
Dissatisfaction [BD], Drive for Thinness [DT], and Bulimia [BUL]) revealed
marked differences in content of the items, with three subscales (IE, BD,
and DT) including only attitudinal items, and one subscale, (BUL)
including only behavioral items. This study investigated the relationship
between the EDI-II subscales and independent measures of ED behavior and
self-esteem, an overall self-attitude. The EDI-II and Rosenberg
Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965) were administered to 45 women with an
eating disorder of anorexia or bulimia nervosa. ED behaviors (bingeing,
vomiting, laxative, diuretic, and diet pill use, and exercising) were
recorded as they occurred using a PalmPilot for 22 days. The BUL subscale
that is comprised of behavioral items was correlated with two ED
behaviors: bingeing (r=.36, p<.02) and vomiting (r=.26, p=.08), but not to
self-esteem (r=-.19, p=ns). Two of three EDI-II subscales that are
comprised of attitudinal items (IE and DT) were inversely correlated with
self-esteem as predicted (IE: r=-.75, p<.001, DT: r=-.31, p<.03); BD was
not significant: r=-.22, p=.13. Only one of three attitudinal scales (IE)
was correlated with ED behaviors (laxative use (r=.52, p<.001), diuretic
use (r=.36, p<.02) and exercise (r=.34, p<.03). Results provide evidence
of convergent validity for EDI-II subscales being differentially
associated with ED attitudes and behaviors. Studies using the EDI-II to
evaluate treatment success should distinguish between ED attitudes and
behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValidity of the EDI-II for Assessing Eating Disordered Attitudes and Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158502-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Validity of the EDI-II for Assessing Eating Disordered Attitudes and Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sargent, Judy, MS, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(734) 332-8995</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jsargent@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen F. Stein, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI-II) is a widely used measure of <br/> eating disordered attitudes and behaviors that is used to evaluate <br/> treatment success in eating disorder (ED) intervention studies. However, <br/> attitudes (affective judgments) and behaviors (observable activities) are <br/> discrete concepts that have been conceptually blurred in this work. A <br/> large body of research has shown that attitudes are not synonymous with, <br/> nor do they reliably predict behavior (Eagly &amp; Chaiken, 1998). An analysis <br/> of the four main EDI-II subscales (Ineffectiveness [IE], Body <br/> Dissatisfaction [BD], Drive for Thinness [DT], and Bulimia [BUL]) revealed <br/> marked differences in content of the items, with three subscales (IE, BD, <br/> and DT) including only attitudinal items, and one subscale, (BUL) <br/> including only behavioral items. This study investigated the relationship <br/> between the EDI-II subscales and independent measures of ED behavior and <br/> self-esteem, an overall self-attitude. The EDI-II and Rosenberg <br/> Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965) were administered to 45 women with an <br/> eating disorder of anorexia or bulimia nervosa. ED behaviors (bingeing, <br/> vomiting, laxative, diuretic, and diet pill use, and exercising) were <br/> recorded as they occurred using a PalmPilot for 22 days. The BUL subscale <br/> that is comprised of behavioral items was correlated with two ED <br/> behaviors: bingeing (r=.36, p&lt;.02) and vomiting (r=.26, p=.08), but not to <br/> self-esteem (r=-.19, p=ns). Two of three EDI-II subscales that are <br/> comprised of attitudinal items (IE and DT) were inversely correlated with <br/> self-esteem as predicted (IE: r=-.75, p&lt;.001, DT: r=-.31, p&lt;.03); BD was <br/> not significant: r=-.22, p=.13. Only one of three attitudinal scales (IE) <br/> was correlated with ED behaviors (laxative use (r=.52, p&lt;.001), diuretic <br/> use (r=.36, p&lt;.02) and exercise (r=.34, p&lt;.03). Results provide evidence <br/> of convergent validity for EDI-II subscales being differentially <br/> associated with ED attitudes and behaviors. Studies using the EDI-II to <br/> evaluate treatment success should distinguish between ED attitudes and <br/> behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:07:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:07:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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