Social Support and Health Behavior Change related to Physical Activity and Nutrition among Ethnically-Diverse, Low-Income Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158503
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Support and Health Behavior Change related to Physical Activity and Nutrition among Ethnically-Diverse, Low-Income Patients
Abstract:
Social Support and Health Behavior Change related to Physical Activity and Nutrition among Ethnically-Diverse, Low-Income Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Schafer, Patricia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Grand Valley State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 301 Michigan St NE, Grand Rapids, MI, 49503, USA
Contact Telephone:(616) 331-7166
Co-Authors:Sally P. Lundeen, FAAN, RN, Dean and Jennifer Dykstra, MSN, RN
Problem. Social support is an important concept toward the
facilitation of health behavior change. In a study to examine the
effectiveness of social support among ethnically diverse, low income
clients, the presence of "health buddies" was chosen as one of the
operational definitions of social support. This paper presents findings
regarding the role of "health buddies" in supporting and sustaining health
behavior change according to participants in a focus group conducted 6
weeks after the completion of the structured intervention. Framework. The
Health Belief Model in concert with Lundeen's Nursing Center Model guided
this study. Subjects. All subjects from the study were invited six weeks
after the structured interventionÆs conclusion. An extension of the
original IRB approval was granted at one nursing center site for the focus
group. Method. A focus group was conducted using a semi-structured
interview format. The interview questions were based on an extensive
review of the literature on the role of social support in achieving and
sustaining health behavior change. Results. The participants actively
shared their impressions of the intervention and their perceptions of a
"health buddy". Major themes focused on the importance of others being
there for you; being there for each other; and recognizing that they were
not alone in their unhealthy behaviors. Conclusion. One challenge of
working with clients of diverse ethnicities and those in poverty is to
translate the concepts of health behavior change to meaningful life
experiences. These participants presented characteristics of the culture
of poverty that include aloneness, lack of recognition of one's value, and
a need for feeling accountable to or for someone. Nurses can use "health
buddies" as a significant positive impact for health behavior change in
ethnically-diverse, low income patients. Funding: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Support and Health Behavior Change related to Physical Activity and Nutrition among Ethnically-Diverse, Low-Income Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158503-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social Support and Health Behavior Change related to Physical Activity and Nutrition among Ethnically-Diverse, Low-Income Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schafer, Patricia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Grand Valley State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 301 Michigan St NE, Grand Rapids, MI, 49503, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(616) 331-7166</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">schaferp@gvsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sally P. Lundeen, FAAN, RN, Dean and Jennifer Dykstra, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem. Social support is an important concept toward the <br/> facilitation of health behavior change. In a study to examine the <br/> effectiveness of social support among ethnically diverse, low income <br/> clients, the presence of &quot;health buddies&quot; was chosen as one of the <br/> operational definitions of social support. This paper presents findings <br/> regarding the role of &quot;health buddies&quot; in supporting and sustaining health <br/> behavior change according to participants in a focus group conducted 6 <br/> weeks after the completion of the structured intervention. Framework. The <br/> Health Belief Model in concert with Lundeen's Nursing Center Model guided <br/> this study. Subjects. All subjects from the study were invited six weeks <br/> after the structured intervention&AElig;s conclusion. An extension of the <br/> original IRB approval was granted at one nursing center site for the focus <br/> group. Method. A focus group was conducted using a semi-structured <br/> interview format. The interview questions were based on an extensive <br/> review of the literature on the role of social support in achieving and <br/> sustaining health behavior change. Results. The participants actively <br/> shared their impressions of the intervention and their perceptions of a <br/> &quot;health buddy&quot;. Major themes focused on the importance of others being <br/> there for you; being there for each other; and recognizing that they were <br/> not alone in their unhealthy behaviors. Conclusion. One challenge of <br/> working with clients of diverse ethnicities and those in poverty is to <br/> translate the concepts of health behavior change to meaningful life <br/> experiences. These participants presented characteristics of the culture <br/> of poverty that include aloneness, lack of recognition of one's value, and <br/> a need for feeling accountable to or for someone. Nurses can use &quot;health <br/> buddies&quot; as a significant positive impact for health behavior change in <br/> ethnically-diverse, low income patients. Funding: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:07:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:07:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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