Genetic Predictors of Variability in Cognition, Function, and Behavior in Persons with Alzheimer Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158504
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Genetic Predictors of Variability in Cognition, Function, and Behavior in Persons with Alzheimer Disease
Abstract:
Genetic Predictors of Variability in Cognition, Function, and Behavior in Persons with Alzheimer Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Schutte, Debra, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 484 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121, USA
Contact Telephone:319/384-4700
Co-Authors:Susan DeCrane, MA, RN, Predoctoral Student; Kathryn L Flanders, MSN, APRN, Predoctoral Student; Anne D Letocha, MSN, APRN, Predoctoral Student; Kathryn Lothamer, Research Assistant; and Elizabeth Forest, Research Assistant
Background Alzheimer disease (AD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative
disorder, characterized by dementia. The phenotype of persons with AD
differs in age at onset, rate of progression, and specific cognitive,
functional, and behavioral impairments. Little is known about the
contribution of gene variants to these differences in phenotype. The
identification of genes that influence phenotypic variability in AD is
needed in order to intervene in a more specific and effective manner.
Purpose The purpose of this pilot study is to examine the contribution of
candidate genes, hypothesized to play a role in the beta-amyloid pathway,
to cognition, function, and behavior in persons with advanced AD.
Methodology A longitudinal, correlational study design was used.
Thirty-seven subjects diagnosed with probable AD were recruited from five
long-term care facilities. Whole blood or cheek cells were collected for
DNA extraction and genotyping. Measures of cognitive status (Global
Deterioration Scale, Severe Impairment Battery), functional ability
(Functional Abilities Checklist), and behavioral features (Cohen-Mansfield
Agitation Inventory, Neuropsychiatric Inventory) were collected at
four-month intervals over one year.
Results Subjects exhibited a mean age at onset of 77.1 years. All subjects
were moderately to severely cognitively impaired. Subjects were genotyped,
using PCR techniques, for common sequence variations in the following
genes: Apolipoprotein E, Lipoprotein Receptor Protein-Associated Protein
1, Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1, and the
Alpha-2-Macroglobulin gene. Statistical analyses are underway to describe
the phenotypic characteristics of the sample across timepoints. Survival
analysis will be used to compare genotype groups according to age at
onset. Repeated measures MANCOVA techniques will be used to test the
relationship between genotypes and profiles of cognition, function, and
behavior over time. Results from this pilot study will direct the design
and implementation of a large prospective study to examine the
relationship between genetic variability and phenotype in persons with AD.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGenetic Predictors of Variability in Cognition, Function, and Behavior in Persons with Alzheimer Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158504-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Genetic Predictors of Variability in Cognition, Function, and Behavior in Persons with Alzheimer Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schutte, Debra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 484 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319/384-4700</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">debra-schutte@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan DeCrane, MA, RN, Predoctoral Student; Kathryn L Flanders, MSN, APRN, Predoctoral Student; Anne D Letocha, MSN, APRN, Predoctoral Student; Kathryn Lothamer, Research Assistant; and Elizabeth Forest, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background Alzheimer disease (AD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative <br/> disorder, characterized by dementia. The phenotype of persons with AD <br/> differs in age at onset, rate of progression, and specific cognitive, <br/> functional, and behavioral impairments. Little is known about the <br/> contribution of gene variants to these differences in phenotype. The <br/> identification of genes that influence phenotypic variability in AD is <br/> needed in order to intervene in a more specific and effective manner.<br/> Purpose The purpose of this pilot study is to examine the contribution of <br/> candidate genes, hypothesized to play a role in the beta-amyloid pathway, <br/> to cognition, function, and behavior in persons with advanced AD. <br/> Methodology A longitudinal, correlational study design was used. <br/> Thirty-seven subjects diagnosed with probable AD were recruited from five <br/> long-term care facilities. Whole blood or cheek cells were collected for <br/> DNA extraction and genotyping. Measures of cognitive status (Global <br/> Deterioration Scale, Severe Impairment Battery), functional ability <br/> (Functional Abilities Checklist), and behavioral features (Cohen-Mansfield <br/> Agitation Inventory, Neuropsychiatric Inventory) were collected at <br/> four-month intervals over one year. <br/> Results Subjects exhibited a mean age at onset of 77.1 years. All subjects <br/> were moderately to severely cognitively impaired. Subjects were genotyped, <br/> using PCR techniques, for common sequence variations in the following <br/> genes: Apolipoprotein E, Lipoprotein Receptor Protein-Associated Protein <br/> 1, Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1, and the <br/> Alpha-2-Macroglobulin gene. Statistical analyses are underway to describe <br/> the phenotypic characteristics of the sample across timepoints. Survival <br/> analysis will be used to compare genotype groups according to age at <br/> onset. Repeated measures MANCOVA techniques will be used to test the <br/> relationship between genotypes and profiles of cognition, function, and <br/> behavior over time. Results from this pilot study will direct the design <br/> and implementation of a large prospective study to examine the <br/> relationship between genetic variability and phenotype in persons with AD.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:07:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:07:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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