2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158511
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Corticosterone impact on cognitive function and physical resources in aging
Abstract:
Corticosterone impact on cognitive function and physical resources in aging
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Therrien, Barbara, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734-936-9792
Co-Authors:Brenda Drummond, MSN, CNS, CNP, Predoctoral Student; Hala Darwich, RN, BSN, Predoctoral Student; Alice Davis, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; and Bonnie Metzger, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Purpose: To examine the impact of stress-induced corticosterone (CORT)
on cognitive function and lean tissue mass (LTM) in aging.
Subjects: Female F1 Hybrid (Fisher 344 x Brown Norway) rats aged 4-6
months (adult controls, n=4), 22-25 months (young old, n=10) and 27-30
months (old, n=10) were used.
Methods: To measure cognitive performance, directional heading error (DHE)
on the Morris water maze was recorded in each animal during 4 trials per
day, 8 days pre and post-stress. LTM was estimated using bioelectrical
impedance analysis immediately pre and one week post-stress. CORT was
determined by radioimmunoassay pre-stress and on day 8 post-stress.
Duration of stress events increased by 5 minutes every day for 8
post-stress days.
Results: CORT levels pre-stress, designated as low or high, were
significantly different (low=311.3 plus or minus 134.7 g/dl, n=11; high=600.6 plus or minus 133.2
g/dl, n=13; t=-5.29, p < 0.001). Pre-stress mean CORT was significantly
lower than post-stress mean CORT (455 plus or minus 197.5 g/dl vs. 1376 plus or minus 482.3 g/dl,
n=24; t=-9.946, p<0.001). Rats with high pre and post-stress CORT showed
no improvement in DHE until the fourth day after stress events. Rats with
low CORT demonstrated no effect of stress on cognition. Difference in
learning between groups was not significant. High CORT post-stress was
associated with greater loss of LTM (r=1.000, p < 0.001, n=13). There was
no association between age, CORT or DHE post-stress (r=0.36, p < 0.05,
n=24).
Conclusions: High CORT in the presence of stress is associated with
greater loss of LTM and may be associated with reduced cognitive function,
independent of age.
Support Contributed By: CERCF, University of Michigan; CFAR, University of
Michigan, NIH P60 AG08808-15
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorticosterone impact on cognitive function and physical resources in agingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158511-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Corticosterone impact on cognitive function and physical resources in aging</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Therrien, Barbara, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-936-9792</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">therrien@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Brenda Drummond, MSN, CNS, CNP, Predoctoral Student; Hala Darwich, RN, BSN, Predoctoral Student; Alice Davis, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; and Bonnie Metzger, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To examine the impact of stress-induced corticosterone (CORT) <br/> on cognitive function and lean tissue mass (LTM) in aging. <br/> Subjects: Female F1 Hybrid (Fisher 344 x Brown Norway) rats aged 4-6 <br/> months (adult controls, n=4), 22-25 months (young old, n=10) and 27-30 <br/> months (old, n=10) were used.<br/> Methods: To measure cognitive performance, directional heading error (DHE) <br/> on the Morris water maze was recorded in each animal during 4 trials per <br/> day, 8 days pre and post-stress. LTM was estimated using bioelectrical <br/> impedance analysis immediately pre and one week post-stress. CORT was <br/> determined by radioimmunoassay pre-stress and on day 8 post-stress. <br/> Duration of stress events increased by 5 minutes every day for 8 <br/> post-stress days. <br/> Results: CORT levels pre-stress, designated as low or high, were <br/> significantly different (low=311.3 plus or minus 134.7 g/dl, n=11; high=600.6 plus or minus 133.2 <br/> g/dl, n=13; t=-5.29, p &lt; 0.001). Pre-stress mean CORT was significantly <br/> lower than post-stress mean CORT (455 plus or minus 197.5 g/dl vs. 1376 plus or minus 482.3 g/dl, <br/> n=24; t=-9.946, p&lt;0.001). Rats with high pre and post-stress CORT showed <br/> no improvement in DHE until the fourth day after stress events. Rats with <br/> low CORT demonstrated no effect of stress on cognition. Difference in <br/> learning between groups was not significant. High CORT post-stress was <br/> associated with greater loss of LTM (r=1.000, p &lt; 0.001, n=13). There was <br/> no association between age, CORT or DHE post-stress (r=0.36, p &lt; 0.05, <br/> n=24). <br/> Conclusions: High CORT in the presence of stress is associated with <br/> greater loss of LTM and may be associated with reduced cognitive function, <br/> independent of age.<br/> Support Contributed By: CERCF, University of Michigan; CFAR, University of <br/> Michigan, NIH P60 AG08808-15</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:07:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:07:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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