2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158518
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Copper Deficiency: Consequences for Offspring
Abstract:
Maternal Copper Deficiency: Consequences for Offspring
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Anderson, Cindy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Contact Address:College of Nursing - Stop 9025, 430 Oxford Street, Room 307, Grand Forks, ND, 58202, USA
Co-Authors:L. Kibot, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; and W. Johnson, USDA ARS Human Nutrition Research Center, Grand Forks, ND
Maternal copper deficiency during pregnancy and lactation impairs development of the cardiovascular system. Maternal copper deficiency induces reduction in cytochrome C oxidase activity in neonatal cardiac mitochondria, suggesting the potential of future adult disease resulting from developmental alterations. Effects of maternal copper deficiency growth in male and female offspring are unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of maternal copper deficiency on growth and development of progeny. Copper deficiency (CuD) was induced by maintaining Sprague-Dawley dams on a diet (AIN-93G) containing 1 mg of copper/kg of diet from three weeks prior to pregnancy through the end of the lactation period. Copper adequate (CuA) dams were maintained a diet containing 6 mg of copper/kg diet. After birth, half of the litters completed the period of lactation with their birth mothers, with the remaining litters cross-fostered. After weaning, all offspring groups were maintained on the copper adequate diet. Blood pressure determinations were made using a tail-cuff, coupled to a volume-pressure recorder. Body and heart were weighed in male and female offspring groups at the end of the weaning period, 3 weeks of age. Comparisons between groups were made using student's T test or ANOVA with Tukey post hoc test as appropriate. There were no significant differences in the weight of copper deficient dams compared to copper adequate dams. At 3 weeks of age, there were no differences in body weight between offspring groups within genders. In males, heart to body weight ratio was significantly reduced in males exposed to an adequate copper intrauterine environment, followed by lactation from copper deficient dams as compared to males exposed to copper deficiency in-utero and during lactation. In female offspring, heart to body ratio was reduced in those exposed to a copper adequate intrauterine environment followed by lactation by copper deficient dams compared to females exposed to a copper deficient intrauterine environment followed by lactation in a copper adequate dam. We conclude that a postnatal nutritional deficient in copper reduces cardiac size in the absence of altered body weight, potentially leading to long-term cardiovascular sequelae.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Copper Deficiency: Consequences for Offspringen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158518-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal Copper Deficiency: Consequences for Offspring</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Cindy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing - Stop 9025, 430 Oxford Street, Room 307, Grand Forks, ND, 58202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cindyanderson@mail.und.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L. Kibot, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; and W. Johnson, USDA ARS Human Nutrition Research Center, Grand Forks, ND</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Maternal copper deficiency during pregnancy and lactation impairs development of the cardiovascular system. Maternal copper deficiency induces reduction in cytochrome C oxidase activity in neonatal cardiac mitochondria, suggesting the potential of future adult disease resulting from developmental alterations. Effects of maternal copper deficiency growth in male and female offspring are unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of maternal copper deficiency on growth and development of progeny. Copper deficiency (CuD) was induced by maintaining Sprague-Dawley dams on a diet (AIN-93G) containing 1 mg of copper/kg of diet from three weeks prior to pregnancy through the end of the lactation period. Copper adequate (CuA) dams were maintained a diet containing 6 mg of copper/kg diet. After birth, half of the litters completed the period of lactation with their birth mothers, with the remaining litters cross-fostered. After weaning, all offspring groups were maintained on the copper adequate diet. Blood pressure determinations were made using a tail-cuff, coupled to a volume-pressure recorder. Body and heart were weighed in male and female offspring groups at the end of the weaning period, 3 weeks of age. Comparisons between groups were made using student's T test or ANOVA with Tukey post hoc test as appropriate. There were no significant differences in the weight of copper deficient dams compared to copper adequate dams. At 3 weeks of age, there were no differences in body weight between offspring groups within genders. In males, heart to body weight ratio was significantly reduced in males exposed to an adequate copper intrauterine environment, followed by lactation from copper deficient dams as compared to males exposed to copper deficiency in-utero and during lactation. In female offspring, heart to body ratio was reduced in those exposed to a copper adequate intrauterine environment followed by lactation by copper deficient dams compared to females exposed to a copper deficient intrauterine environment followed by lactation in a copper adequate dam. We conclude that a postnatal nutritional deficient in copper reduces cardiac size in the absence of altered body weight, potentially leading to long-term cardiovascular sequelae.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:08:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:08:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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