2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158519
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mentoring ICU Nurses: Perceptions of Mentoring Received and Importance
Abstract:
Mentoring ICU Nurses: Perceptions of Mentoring Received and Importance
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Anthony, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Contact Address:P. O. Box 5190, 113 Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Co-Authors:J.M. Clochesy, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
Background: ICUs have high RN turnover and mentored orientation programs are one way to help nurses transition to ICU. Mentoring is an important relationship that a new nurse can have. Purpose: Compare and assess change in nurses' actual experience of and perceived importance of key mentoring functions at two time points over a 6 month ICU orientation. Design: A descriptive comparative methodology using 3 cohorts of RNs that had a 25 week mentored orientation following the AACN curriculum. Method: 45 RNs, new to one of 4 ICUs at a major university hospital, were assigned an RN mentor. The Fowler Mentoring survey (2005), consisting of 8 dimensions of mentoring (personal and emotional guidance, coaching, advocacy, career development, role modeling, strategies and systems advice, learning facilitation, and friendship) was administered. Results: After 2 cohorts (data on the third cohort is being completed), at 3 and 6 months, there were: a) no differences in actual mentoring received over time and b) no difference in perceived importance of mentoring, and c) there were statistically significant differences when actual mentoring received was compared to the importance of mentoring. At both time points, learning facilitation, role modeling and coaching were rated highest in actual mentoring received as well as perceived importance. Data that includes the third cohort will presented. Implications: Shortages in critical care nursing workforce are projected to worsen. The importance of mentors who understand the needs of new nurses is an important component of mentoring. Programs that mentor the mentor are also needed so mentors can tailor each dimension to the new nurse. Funded by Department of Health & Human Services: Nurse Education, Practice, and Retention Grant Program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMentoring ICU Nurses: Perceptions of Mentoring Received and Importanceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158519-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mentoring ICU Nurses: Perceptions of Mentoring Received and Importance</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anthony, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">P. O. Box 5190, 113 Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">manthony@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.M. Clochesy, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: ICUs have high RN turnover and mentored orientation programs are one way to help nurses transition to ICU. Mentoring is an important relationship that a new nurse can have. Purpose: Compare and assess change in nurses' actual experience of and perceived importance of key mentoring functions at two time points over a 6 month ICU orientation. Design: A descriptive comparative methodology using 3 cohorts of RNs that had a 25 week mentored orientation following the AACN curriculum. Method: 45 RNs, new to one of 4 ICUs at a major university hospital, were assigned an RN mentor. The Fowler Mentoring survey (2005), consisting of 8 dimensions of mentoring (personal and emotional guidance, coaching, advocacy, career development, role modeling, strategies and systems advice, learning facilitation, and friendship) was administered. Results: After 2 cohorts (data on the third cohort is being completed), at 3 and 6 months, there were: a) no differences in actual mentoring received over time and b) no difference in perceived importance of mentoring, and c) there were statistically significant differences when actual mentoring received was compared to the importance of mentoring. At both time points, learning facilitation, role modeling and coaching were rated highest in actual mentoring received as well as perceived importance. Data that includes the third cohort will presented. Implications: Shortages in critical care nursing workforce are projected to worsen. The importance of mentors who understand the needs of new nurses is an important component of mentoring. Programs that mentor the mentor are also needed so mentors can tailor each dimension to the new nurse. Funded by Department of Health &amp; Human Services: Nurse Education, Practice, and Retention Grant Program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:08:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:08:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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