Environmental Enrichment Mitigates Ischemia-Induced Oxidative DNA Damage and Promotes Behavioral Recovery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158521
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Environmental Enrichment Mitigates Ischemia-Induced Oxidative DNA Damage and Promotes Behavioral Recovery
Abstract:
Environmental Enrichment Mitigates Ischemia-Induced Oxidative DNA Damage and Promotes Behavioral Recovery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Briones, Tess, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:M/C 802, Rm 750, 845 S. Damen Ave., Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:M. Rogozinska and J. Woods, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
Complex environment (EC) housing after cerebral ischemia has been shown to enhance functional recovery after the injury. In this study, we examined whether EC housing has direct protective effects on selectively vulnerable neurons that undergo delayed degeneration in response to transient global cerebral ischemia. Sixty-eight adult male Wistar rats were included in the study and received either ischemia or sham surgery. Once rats were fully awake, they were randomly assigned to either: EC housing or socially paired housing (SC, controls). Animals remained in their assigned environment for 7 days then tested in the water maze to evaluate cognitive impairment. Rats were sacrificed after water maze testing and the hippocampus (HPC), region involved in memory processing, was examined for DNA damage and neuronal loss. Our data showed that although ischemia resulted in neuronal loss in the HPC region, ischemic rats housed in EC have greater number of surviving neurons compared to the ischemic SC group. Moreover, significantly increased 8-OHdG immunoreactivity (suggestive of greater DNA damage) was seen in the ischemia SC group compared to the ischemia EC rats. Behavioral analyses showed longer mean swim latencies and distance traveled to reach the goal in the ischemia SC group compared to the ischemia EC rats and the sham groups. These results suggest that EC housing after cerebral ischemia can mitigate the ischemia-induced delayed degeneration of selectively vulnerable neurons as well as enhance functional recovery. Funded in part by NIH, RO1 NR007666
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnvironmental Enrichment Mitigates Ischemia-Induced Oxidative DNA Damage and Promotes Behavioral Recoveryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158521-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Environmental Enrichment Mitigates Ischemia-Induced Oxidative DNA Damage and Promotes Behavioral Recovery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Briones, Tess, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">M/C 802, Rm 750, 845 S. Damen Ave., Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tbriones@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Rogozinska and J. Woods, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Complex environment (EC) housing after cerebral ischemia has been shown to enhance functional recovery after the injury. In this study, we examined whether EC housing has direct protective effects on selectively vulnerable neurons that undergo delayed degeneration in response to transient global cerebral ischemia. Sixty-eight adult male Wistar rats were included in the study and received either ischemia or sham surgery. Once rats were fully awake, they were randomly assigned to either: EC housing or socially paired housing (SC, controls). Animals remained in their assigned environment for 7 days then tested in the water maze to evaluate cognitive impairment. Rats were sacrificed after water maze testing and the hippocampus (HPC), region involved in memory processing, was examined for DNA damage and neuronal loss. Our data showed that although ischemia resulted in neuronal loss in the HPC region, ischemic rats housed in EC have greater number of surviving neurons compared to the ischemic SC group. Moreover, significantly increased 8-OHdG immunoreactivity (suggestive of greater DNA damage) was seen in the ischemia SC group compared to the ischemia EC rats. Behavioral analyses showed longer mean swim latencies and distance traveled to reach the goal in the ischemia SC group compared to the ischemia EC rats and the sham groups. These results suggest that EC housing after cerebral ischemia can mitigate the ischemia-induced delayed degeneration of selectively vulnerable neurons as well as enhance functional recovery. Funded in part by NIH, RO1 NR007666</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:08:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:08:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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