Effects of Modified T'ai Chi Exercise on Physical Function, Pain, and Stiffness in Older Adults With Lower Extremity Osteoarthritis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158523
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Modified T'ai Chi Exercise on Physical Function, Pain, and Stiffness in Older Adults With Lower Extremity Osteoarthritis
Abstract:
Effects of Modified T'ai Chi Exercise on Physical Function, Pain, and Stiffness in Older Adults With Lower Extremity Osteoarthritis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Carpenter, Jacqueline, RN, MS, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Cleveland, MO, 64734, USA
Osteoarthritis is the number one cause of disability in the United States. Exercise is considered a vital component of OA treatment. Though beneficial effects of exercise have been well documented, pain and the accompanying functional disability may be deterrents to physical exercise. T'ai Chi is a unique exercise intervention due to its low-velocity movements. However, some T'ai Chi styles that involve low stances and squatting positions can be difficult and painful for individuals with OA. T'ai Chi for Arthritis is a modified form of the Sun-style T'ai Chi, which reduces pressure and torque on the joints. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a low-dose T'ai Chi for Arthritis on physical function, pain, and stiffness in individuals with OA. Self-reported physical function, pain, and stiffness were evaluated using the WOMACÖ 3.1 Index questionnaire. Twenty-seven older adults with OA (mean age off 81.3 years) participated in an 8 week non-randomized controlled pre-post test quasi-experimental design study of modified T'ai Chi (T'ai Chi for Arthritis). Physical function, pain, and stiffness were measured at baseline and 8 weeks for the T'ai Chi group and control group using the WOMACÖ; 3.1 Index. Qualitative data from interviews and participant observations were analyzed in order to understand the participants' expectations and experiences with T'ai Chi. The T'ai Chi group demonstrated greater improvement in physical function compared to the control group, t (20) = -2.31, p = 0.02. There were no significant between-group differences in pain or stiffness mean difference subscale scores. Qualitative findings indicated that T'ai Chi modified physical symptoms and mediated positive changes in the physical, emotional, and social dimensions, as well as increasing individual and group energy flow. Healthcare practitioners should consider T'ai Chi for Arthritis when prescribing exercise for older adults with OA. Prescription should include dosage recommendations of 3 to 5 sessions per week, combining 20-30 minutes of TC with 10 minutes of warm-up and 10 minutes of cool-down exercises. Continued research of a standardized T'ai Chi, such as T'ai Chi for Arthritis, will help to compare results across T'ai Chi intervention studies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Modified T'ai Chi Exercise on Physical Function, Pain, and Stiffness in Older Adults With Lower Extremity Osteoarthritisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158523-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Modified T'ai Chi Exercise on Physical Function, Pain, and Stiffness in Older Adults With Lower Extremity Osteoarthritis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carpenter, Jacqueline, RN, MS, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Cleveland, MO, 64734, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jcarpenter@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Osteoarthritis is the number one cause of disability in the United States. Exercise is considered a vital component of OA treatment. Though beneficial effects of exercise have been well documented, pain and the accompanying functional disability may be deterrents to physical exercise. T'ai Chi is a unique exercise intervention due to its low-velocity movements. However, some T'ai Chi styles that involve low stances and squatting positions can be difficult and painful for individuals with OA. T'ai Chi for Arthritis is a modified form of the Sun-style T'ai Chi, which reduces pressure and torque on the joints. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a low-dose T'ai Chi for Arthritis on physical function, pain, and stiffness in individuals with OA. Self-reported physical function, pain, and stiffness were evaluated using the WOMAC&Ouml; 3.1 Index questionnaire. Twenty-seven older adults with OA (mean age off 81.3 years) participated in an 8 week non-randomized controlled pre-post test quasi-experimental design study of modified T'ai Chi (T'ai Chi for Arthritis). Physical function, pain, and stiffness were measured at baseline and 8 weeks for the T'ai Chi group and control group using the WOMAC&Ouml;; 3.1 Index. Qualitative data from interviews and participant observations were analyzed in order to understand the participants' expectations and experiences with T'ai Chi. The T'ai Chi group demonstrated greater improvement in physical function compared to the control group, t (20) = -2.31, p = 0.02. There were no significant between-group differences in pain or stiffness mean difference subscale scores. Qualitative findings indicated that T'ai Chi modified physical symptoms and mediated positive changes in the physical, emotional, and social dimensions, as well as increasing individual and group energy flow. Healthcare practitioners should consider T'ai Chi for Arthritis when prescribing exercise for older adults with OA. Prescription should include dosage recommendations of 3 to 5 sessions per week, combining 20-30 minutes of TC with 10 minutes of warm-up and 10 minutes of cool-down exercises. Continued research of a standardized T'ai Chi, such as T'ai Chi for Arthritis, will help to compare results across T'ai Chi intervention studies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:08:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:08:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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