Outcomes of a Culturally-Targeted Behavioral Intervention for Organ and Tissue Donation Among Reservation Dwelling American Indian Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158524
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of a Culturally-Targeted Behavioral Intervention for Organ and Tissue Donation Among Reservation Dwelling American Indian Adults
Abstract:
Outcomes of a Culturally-Targeted Behavioral Intervention for Organ and Tissue Donation Among Reservation Dwelling American Indian Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Fahrenwald, Nancy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:South Dakota State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Brookings, SD, 57007, USA
Co-Authors:C. Belitz and A. Keckler, SD Lion's Eye Bank, Sioux Falls, SD and M. Sharma, , University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
Many racial and ethnic minority groups have a great need for organ donation because of a disproportionately high prevalence of chronic diseases that lead to organ failure. Among American Indian (AI) people there is a dire need for kidney transplantation due to the pervasiveness of type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, corresponding consent rates for organ donation among AI people are low. The purpose of this study was to test a culturally-targeted and theory-based intervention for organ and tissue donation among reservation dwelling AI adults. Derived from the cultural context of the target population, the intervention was based upon the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change. The specific aim was to determine whether the intervention produced changes in intention to serve as an organ or tissue donor. A community-based and quasi-experimental pre/post-test design was used. The setting was four rural American Indian reservations. Participants were reservation dwelling AI adults (N=1850, 58% women). Based upon findings from a qualitative study, the intervention messages (print, video and social marketing materials) were developed based upon the cultural traditions of story-telling and gift giving. Traditional music, prayer, personal interviews, local photography and historical picture archives were used. Messages were selected based upon their relationship to constructs in the Transtheoretical Model. The primary outcome measure was stage of motivational readiness to be an organ/tissue donor (measured pre/post intervention). McNemar's test of significance for dependent samples was used to compare pre- and post-intervention stage of motivational readiness. Participants were categorized as stage non-progressed (no change is stage of motivational readiness, 43%), or stage progressed (progressed one or more stages of motivational readiness, 57%). There were no participants who regressed in stage of change. Progression in stage of change from pre- to post-intervention was significant, chi 2 (1) = 18.32, p <.05. This culturally-targeted intervention for organ and tissue donation resulted in important changes in intention to serve as donor for reservation dwelling AI adults.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of a Culturally-Targeted Behavioral Intervention for Organ and Tissue Donation Among Reservation Dwelling American Indian Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158524-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Outcomes of a Culturally-Targeted Behavioral Intervention for Organ and Tissue Donation Among Reservation Dwelling American Indian Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fahrenwald, Nancy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Dakota State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Brookings, SD, 57007, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Nancy.Fahrenwald@sdstate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Belitz and A. Keckler, SD Lion's Eye Bank, Sioux Falls, SD and M. Sharma, , University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Many racial and ethnic minority groups have a great need for organ donation because of a disproportionately high prevalence of chronic diseases that lead to organ failure. Among American Indian (AI) people there is a dire need for kidney transplantation due to the pervasiveness of type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, corresponding consent rates for organ donation among AI people are low. The purpose of this study was to test a culturally-targeted and theory-based intervention for organ and tissue donation among reservation dwelling AI adults. Derived from the cultural context of the target population, the intervention was based upon the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change. The specific aim was to determine whether the intervention produced changes in intention to serve as an organ or tissue donor. A community-based and quasi-experimental pre/post-test design was used. The setting was four rural American Indian reservations. Participants were reservation dwelling AI adults (N=1850, 58% women). Based upon findings from a qualitative study, the intervention messages (print, video and social marketing materials) were developed based upon the cultural traditions of story-telling and gift giving. Traditional music, prayer, personal interviews, local photography and historical picture archives were used. Messages were selected based upon their relationship to constructs in the Transtheoretical Model. The primary outcome measure was stage of motivational readiness to be an organ/tissue donor (measured pre/post intervention). McNemar's test of significance for dependent samples was used to compare pre- and post-intervention stage of motivational readiness. Participants were categorized as stage non-progressed (no change is stage of motivational readiness, 43%), or stage progressed (progressed one or more stages of motivational readiness, 57%). There were no participants who regressed in stage of change. Progression in stage of change from pre- to post-intervention was significant, chi 2 (1) = 18.32, p &lt;.05. This culturally-targeted intervention for organ and tissue donation resulted in important changes in intention to serve as donor for reservation dwelling AI adults.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:08:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:08:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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