The Effects of Exercise on Negative Affect in Nursing Home Residents With Moderate to Severe Dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158526
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Exercise on Negative Affect in Nursing Home Residents With Moderate to Severe Dementia
Abstract:
The Effects of Exercise on Negative Affect in Nursing Home Residents With Moderate to Severe Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Gardiner, Meghan, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, West Lafayette, IN, 47906, USA
Co-Authors:N. Edwards, and L.P. Sands, School of Nursing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
BACKGROUND It is estimated that 35 percent of those suffering from Alzheimer's disease show symptoms of depression and/or anxiety, which are often manifested by negative affect. Negative affect in persons with dementia is associated with difficult behaviors including repetitive questioning, moaning, and wandering which may reflect depression and/or anxiety. Prior studies have shown that exercise is associated with improved affect, but this effect has not been demonstrated for persons with moderate to severe dementia. OBJECTIVE To determine whether moderate-intensity, chair-based exercise is associated with recognizable changes in affect in nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia. METHODS Thirty-nine patients from two nursing homes participated in a moderate-intensity exercise program that occurred three times a week for 30 minutes. Affect was assessed immediately before and immediately after two exercise sessions; one assessment occurred at the beginning of the study and one occurred six weeks after initiating the exercise program. Affect was measured using the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Apparent Affect Rating Scale which rated six dimensions of affect including pleasure, anger, anxiety, depression, interest, and contentment. Paired t-tests were computed to assess the immediate effect of exercise (before and after a session) and the long-term effect of exercise (from 2 days after initiation to 6 weeks after initiation) on patients' affect ratings. RESULTS The mean age of the participants was 84.6 (SD = 5.5) with 86.2 percent being female and 96.6 percent being white. The mean age at diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease was 83.9. Anxiety was found to be significantly reduced in the patients immediately after an exercise session with a p-value equaling 0.028, similar trends were seen for depression, but they did not reach statistical significance. Anxiety and depression were significantly reduced after six weeks of exercise with (p = 0.013 for anxiety and a p = 0.046 for depression). CONCLUSION Validation of these findings in other sites with other patients may reveal that exercise is a safe, nonpharmacologic intervention for improving symptoms of anxiety and depression among nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Exercise on Negative Affect in Nursing Home Residents With Moderate to Severe Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158526-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Exercise on Negative Affect in Nursing Home Residents With Moderate to Severe Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gardiner, Meghan, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, West Lafayette, IN, 47906, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mgardine@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N. Edwards, and L.P. Sands, School of Nursing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND It is estimated that 35 percent of those suffering from Alzheimer's disease show symptoms of depression and/or anxiety, which are often manifested by negative affect. Negative affect in persons with dementia is associated with difficult behaviors including repetitive questioning, moaning, and wandering which may reflect depression and/or anxiety. Prior studies have shown that exercise is associated with improved affect, but this effect has not been demonstrated for persons with moderate to severe dementia. OBJECTIVE To determine whether moderate-intensity, chair-based exercise is associated with recognizable changes in affect in nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia. METHODS Thirty-nine patients from two nursing homes participated in a moderate-intensity exercise program that occurred three times a week for 30 minutes. Affect was assessed immediately before and immediately after two exercise sessions; one assessment occurred at the beginning of the study and one occurred six weeks after initiating the exercise program. Affect was measured using the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Apparent Affect Rating Scale which rated six dimensions of affect including pleasure, anger, anxiety, depression, interest, and contentment. Paired t-tests were computed to assess the immediate effect of exercise (before and after a session) and the long-term effect of exercise (from 2 days after initiation to 6 weeks after initiation) on patients' affect ratings. RESULTS The mean age of the participants was 84.6 (SD = 5.5) with 86.2 percent being female and 96.6 percent being white. The mean age at diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease was 83.9. Anxiety was found to be significantly reduced in the patients immediately after an exercise session with a p-value equaling 0.028, similar trends were seen for depression, but they did not reach statistical significance. Anxiety and depression were significantly reduced after six weeks of exercise with (p = 0.013 for anxiety and a p = 0.046 for depression). CONCLUSION Validation of these findings in other sites with other patients may reveal that exercise is a safe, nonpharmacologic intervention for improving symptoms of anxiety and depression among nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:08:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:08:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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