2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158530
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing Venous Ulcer Healing in Older Adults
Abstract:
Factors Influencing Venous Ulcer Healing in Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Jones, Katherine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Background: Leg ulcers affect 1-2% of the population, with women affected three times more frequently than men. Dressings that provide a moist environment and compression bandaging have both proven clinically effective for treatment, but many healthcare providers lack the necessary knowledge and training to treat these ulcers efficiently. Purpose: This study sought to identify demographic, clinical and treatment factors that influence venous ulcer healing or deterioration after 6 months of treatment. Methods: A retrospective chart review using a structured data collection protocol was conducted at 4 geographically diverse sites. Settings of care delivery included hospitals, clinics and wound care centers, home health agencies, and skilled nursing care. Included in the sample were subjects over age 50 who had a documented chronic venous, diabetic, or pressure ulcer. Excluded were Stage I pressure ulcers, and subjects receiving hemodialysis and organ transplantation. Results: The sample consisted of 400 subjects, of whom 183 had at least one venous leg ulcer. Six-month healing rate was 53.5%. Demographics were: 61.7% female; 68.9% over 65; 35.8% married; 63.1% white; and 56.3% with Medicare or Medicare plus gap insurance. Bivariate analyses showed that factors influencing healing included age, race, insurance type, having multiple risk factors (smoking, malnutrition), initial size and depth, maximum exudate amount, and selected type of debridement, dressing, and compression. Factors influencing wound deterioration included age, malnutrition, and type of dressing and compression. Case-mix, treatment approaches, and outcomes all varied significantly across care delivery sites. Conclusion: Multiple factors influence whether a chronic venous ulcer will heal or deteriorate over time. Organizational factors such as frequency of visits and access to specialists may also make a difference. The potential for improvement is possible with the application of more evidence-based therapies and altered care delivery processes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing Venous Ulcer Healing in Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158530-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Influencing Venous Ulcer Healing in Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Katherine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">katherine.jones@case.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Leg ulcers affect 1-2% of the population, with women affected three times more frequently than men. Dressings that provide a moist environment and compression bandaging have both proven clinically effective for treatment, but many healthcare providers lack the necessary knowledge and training to treat these ulcers efficiently. Purpose: This study sought to identify demographic, clinical and treatment factors that influence venous ulcer healing or deterioration after 6 months of treatment. Methods: A retrospective chart review using a structured data collection protocol was conducted at 4 geographically diverse sites. Settings of care delivery included hospitals, clinics and wound care centers, home health agencies, and skilled nursing care. Included in the sample were subjects over age 50 who had a documented chronic venous, diabetic, or pressure ulcer. Excluded were Stage I pressure ulcers, and subjects receiving hemodialysis and organ transplantation. Results: The sample consisted of 400 subjects, of whom 183 had at least one venous leg ulcer. Six-month healing rate was 53.5%. Demographics were: 61.7% female; 68.9% over 65; 35.8% married; 63.1% white; and 56.3% with Medicare or Medicare plus gap insurance. Bivariate analyses showed that factors influencing healing included age, race, insurance type, having multiple risk factors (smoking, malnutrition), initial size and depth, maximum exudate amount, and selected type of debridement, dressing, and compression. Factors influencing wound deterioration included age, malnutrition, and type of dressing and compression. Case-mix, treatment approaches, and outcomes all varied significantly across care delivery sites. Conclusion: Multiple factors influence whether a chronic venous ulcer will heal or deteriorate over time. Organizational factors such as frequency of visits and access to specialists may also make a difference. The potential for improvement is possible with the application of more evidence-based therapies and altered care delivery processes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:08:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:08:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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