A Secondary Analysis of Selected Patient Factors Associated with the Status of Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158533
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Secondary Analysis of Selected Patient Factors Associated with the Status of Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomes
Abstract:
A Secondary Analysis of Selected Patient Factors Associated with the Status of Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Kerr, Peg, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Contact Address:College of Nursing - 310 Nursing Building, 50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121, USA
This study used secondary data from a larger study, "Evaluation of Nursing Sensitive Patient Outcome Measures" (RO1 NR 03437) that were analyzed to evaluate risk variables for 4 Nursing Outcome Classification (NOC) outcomes: Health Promoting Behavior, Self-Care: Activities of Daily Living, Ambulation: Walking, and Vital Signs Status. The purpose of this exploratory descriptive study was to contribute to the development of risk adjustment methods for nursing effectiveness research by assessing the ability of specific patient characteristics (age, gender, primary medical diagnosis, socioeconomic status (SES), and comorbidities) to explain variation in the four NOC outcomes. The parent study sample was taken from 10 field settings in the Midwest representing the continuum of care. Contingency table methods and multivariable logistic regression were used to develop a statistical model of risk for each outcome.<p> Having a diagnosis in the category of Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue compared favorably to the other ICD-9-CM classes; patients rated on the Self-Care: Activities of Daily Living and Ambulation: Walking outcomes both were more likely to show improvement than other categories. Having an Endocrine, Nutritional, and Metabolic Diseases, and Immunity Disorders category diagnosis or a Mental Disorder for patients rated on Health Promoting Behavior, or having a Manually-Assisted Delivery or C-Section procedure for those rated on Ambulation: Walking, also were associated with being more likely to improve.<p> Being in the 65-74 age group resulted in being almost 4 times more likely to show no improvement in Self-Care: Activities of Daily Living than those in the youngest category (18-64). However, when the youngest category was used as the reference group for Vital Signs Status, patients in the age ranges of 40-84 were from 88-98 percent more likely to improve than their younger counterparts. <p> Comorbid conditions were shown to be significant to the status of one NOC outcome: Self-Care: Activities of Daily Living; having 3 or more comorbidities increased the odds of not improving by 6. Overall, gender and SES status were not shown to be significantly related to improvement or lack of improvement for any of the outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Secondary Analysis of Selected Patient Factors Associated with the Status of Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158533-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Secondary Analysis of Selected Patient Factors Associated with the Status of Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kerr, Peg, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing - 310 Nursing Building, 50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">peggy-kerr@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study used secondary data from a larger study, &quot;Evaluation of Nursing Sensitive Patient Outcome Measures&quot; (RO1 NR 03437) that were analyzed to evaluate risk variables for 4 Nursing Outcome Classification (NOC) outcomes: Health Promoting Behavior, Self-Care: Activities of Daily Living, Ambulation: Walking, and Vital Signs Status. The purpose of this exploratory descriptive study was to contribute to the development of risk adjustment methods for nursing effectiveness research by assessing the ability of specific patient characteristics (age, gender, primary medical diagnosis, socioeconomic status (SES), and comorbidities) to explain variation in the four NOC outcomes. The parent study sample was taken from 10 field settings in the Midwest representing the continuum of care. Contingency table methods and multivariable logistic regression were used to develop a statistical model of risk for each outcome.&lt;p&gt; Having a diagnosis in the category of Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue compared favorably to the other ICD-9-CM classes; patients rated on the Self-Care: Activities of Daily Living and Ambulation: Walking outcomes both were more likely to show improvement than other categories. Having an Endocrine, Nutritional, and Metabolic Diseases, and Immunity Disorders category diagnosis or a Mental Disorder for patients rated on Health Promoting Behavior, or having a Manually-Assisted Delivery or C-Section procedure for those rated on Ambulation: Walking, also were associated with being more likely to improve.&lt;p&gt; Being in the 65-74 age group resulted in being almost 4 times more likely to show no improvement in Self-Care: Activities of Daily Living than those in the youngest category (18-64). However, when the youngest category was used as the reference group for Vital Signs Status, patients in the age ranges of 40-84 were from 88-98 percent more likely to improve than their younger counterparts. &lt;p&gt; Comorbid conditions were shown to be significant to the status of one NOC outcome: Self-Care: Activities of Daily Living; having 3 or more comorbidities increased the odds of not improving by 6. Overall, gender and SES status were not shown to be significantly related to improvement or lack of improvement for any of the outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:09:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:09:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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