Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and Current Sexual Trauma Among High-Risk Adolescent Mothers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158537
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and Current Sexual Trauma Among High-Risk Adolescent Mothers
Abstract:
Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and Current Sexual Trauma Among High-Risk Adolescent Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Mylant, MaryLou, PhD, APRN, CNP
P.I. Institution Name:South Dakota State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Hermosa, SD, 57744, USA
The data presented in this paper is from a larger evaluation study of a project to enhance mental health of American Indian (AI, primarily Lakota) teen mothers. American Indian women experience IPV at much higher rates than other groups and partner abuse during pregnancy is significantly related to decreased birth weight and inadequate prenatal care (Bohn, 2002). The purpose of the current study was to describe the prevalence of IPV, specifically sexual violence, experienced by AI teen moms and to further explore the relationship of sexual trauma, trauma symptoms, and child abuse potential. Intimate Partner Violence and sexual violence were measured using the Abuse Assessment Scale (Nursing Research Consortium on Violence and Abuse). Trauma symptoms were measured using the Trauma Symptom Inventory (Briere, 1994) and the CAP (Milner, 1986) was used to measure child abuse potential. Forty-nine low income AI teen mothers between 16-21 years of age participated in the evaluation study. Significant findings included 86% of the teen moms experiencing IPV with 53% having experienced IPV during pregnancy; Furthermore, physical violence during pregnancy was significantly (p<.000) related to current sexual abuse by their partner. Sexual abuse within the past year was also positively and significantly related (p<.03) to potential child abuse, dissociation, and trauma scores of the teen moms. Each of the trauma scales was significantly (p<.03) associated with child abuse potential. Furthermore, the defensive avoidance and anger/irritability scales of the trauma inventory were significantly related (p<.008) to current sexual trauma. The causal link between IPV and psychiatric disorders has been assumed, yet questioned because of the correlational nature of past studies and the high rate of psychiatric disorders present among teens involved in IPV; However, the findings of this study lend support to a recent longitudinal cohort study by Ehrensaft et al.(2006) that identifies IPV as a contributing source of psychiatric disorders among women. Results of the current study also support the need for rigorous assessment of IPV, especially sexual violence, among high-risk teen moms and further development and testing of interventions for AI teen parents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntimate Partner Violence (IPV) and Current Sexual Trauma Among High-Risk Adolescent Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158537-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and Current Sexual Trauma Among High-Risk Adolescent Mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mylant, MaryLou, PhD, APRN, CNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Dakota State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Hermosa, SD, 57744, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">MaryLou_Mylant@sdstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The data presented in this paper is from a larger evaluation study of a project to enhance mental health of American Indian (AI, primarily Lakota) teen mothers. American Indian women experience IPV at much higher rates than other groups and partner abuse during pregnancy is significantly related to decreased birth weight and inadequate prenatal care (Bohn, 2002). The purpose of the current study was to describe the prevalence of IPV, specifically sexual violence, experienced by AI teen moms and to further explore the relationship of sexual trauma, trauma symptoms, and child abuse potential. Intimate Partner Violence and sexual violence were measured using the Abuse Assessment Scale (Nursing Research Consortium on Violence and Abuse). Trauma symptoms were measured using the Trauma Symptom Inventory (Briere, 1994) and the CAP (Milner, 1986) was used to measure child abuse potential. Forty-nine low income AI teen mothers between 16-21 years of age participated in the evaluation study. Significant findings included 86% of the teen moms experiencing IPV with 53% having experienced IPV during pregnancy; Furthermore, physical violence during pregnancy was significantly (p&lt;.000) related to current sexual abuse by their partner. Sexual abuse within the past year was also positively and significantly related (p&lt;.03) to potential child abuse, dissociation, and trauma scores of the teen moms. Each of the trauma scales was significantly (p&lt;.03) associated with child abuse potential. Furthermore, the defensive avoidance and anger/irritability scales of the trauma inventory were significantly related (p&lt;.008) to current sexual trauma. The causal link between IPV and psychiatric disorders has been assumed, yet questioned because of the correlational nature of past studies and the high rate of psychiatric disorders present among teens involved in IPV; However, the findings of this study lend support to a recent longitudinal cohort study by Ehrensaft et al.(2006) that identifies IPV as a contributing source of psychiatric disorders among women. Results of the current study also support the need for rigorous assessment of IPV, especially sexual violence, among high-risk teen moms and further development and testing of interventions for AI teen parents.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:09:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:09:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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