Influence of Heart Failure Caregiving on Caregiver Burden, Caregiver Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Hospitalizations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158540
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Influence of Heart Failure Caregiving on Caregiver Burden, Caregiver Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Hospitalizations
Abstract:
Influence of Heart Failure Caregiving on Caregiver Burden, Caregiver Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Hospitalizations
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Saunders, Mitzi
P.I. Institution Name:University of Detroit Mercy
Contact Address:College of Health Professions, Detroit, MI, 48221-3038, USA
The number of elderly patients with heart failure (HF) is at epidemic proportions. Heart failure related hospitalizations have risen dramatically. Family caregivers suffer too with the burdens of care required by these patients at home. This study is the first to explore both caregiver and HF patient variables as they relate to caregiver burden, caregiver health-related quality of life (HRQL), and HF patient hospitalizations. A structured interview approach was used to gain HF caregivers perceptions of caregiving related to caregiver burden and caregiver HRQL. Patient data were collected using medical records from the previous year. Data were explored using standard multiple regression models to explain variance in caregiver burden, caregiver HRQL, and patient hospitalizations. Several caregiver characteristics and elements within the caregiving environment explained 51% of the variance in caregiver burden (p <.01). Caregiver age, multiple caregiver health problems, caregiver depressive symptoms, greater caregiver hours per week and multiple patient comorbidities were significant contributors. Caregiver burden explained 62% of the variance in caregiver HRQL (p <.01) suggesting caregiver burden to be an important predictor of caregiver HRQL. Caregiver depression, multiple caregiver health problems and higher levels of patient disease severity contributed an additional 2% of variance to the caregiver HRQL model (p <.01). Caregiver family burden, increased care hours and levels of patient disease severity explained 27% of variance in HF patient hospitalizations (p <.01). Caregiver family burden alone explained 13% of the variance in the number of hospital days (p <.05). Caregivers who shared the role, respite caregivers, had significantly lower levels of caregiver family burden (p<.01) than sole caregivers. A strong relationship between HF caregiver burden and caregiver HRQL is suggested by this study's findings. Therefore, it is critical that nurses assess and intervene to improve the lives of HF caregivers to prevent caregiver health decline. The findings highlight the importance of including caregiver outcomes in HF-related research, particularly, lack of perceived family support as it affects patient hospitalizations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfluence of Heart Failure Caregiving on Caregiver Burden, Caregiver Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Hospitalizationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158540-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Influence of Heart Failure Caregiving on Caregiver Burden, Caregiver Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Hospitalizations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Saunders, Mitzi</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Detroit Mercy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Health Professions, Detroit, MI, 48221-3038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">saundemm@udmercy.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The number of elderly patients with heart failure (HF) is at epidemic proportions. Heart failure related hospitalizations have risen dramatically. Family caregivers suffer too with the burdens of care required by these patients at home. This study is the first to explore both caregiver and HF patient variables as they relate to caregiver burden, caregiver health-related quality of life (HRQL), and HF patient hospitalizations. A structured interview approach was used to gain HF caregivers perceptions of caregiving related to caregiver burden and caregiver HRQL. Patient data were collected using medical records from the previous year. Data were explored using standard multiple regression models to explain variance in caregiver burden, caregiver HRQL, and patient hospitalizations. Several caregiver characteristics and elements within the caregiving environment explained 51% of the variance in caregiver burden (p &lt;.01). Caregiver age, multiple caregiver health problems, caregiver depressive symptoms, greater caregiver hours per week and multiple patient comorbidities were significant contributors. Caregiver burden explained 62% of the variance in caregiver HRQL (p &lt;.01) suggesting caregiver burden to be an important predictor of caregiver HRQL. Caregiver depression, multiple caregiver health problems and higher levels of patient disease severity contributed an additional 2% of variance to the caregiver HRQL model (p &lt;.01). Caregiver family burden, increased care hours and levels of patient disease severity explained 27% of variance in HF patient hospitalizations (p &lt;.01). Caregiver family burden alone explained 13% of the variance in the number of hospital days (p &lt;.05). Caregivers who shared the role, respite caregivers, had significantly lower levels of caregiver family burden (p&lt;.01) than sole caregivers. A strong relationship between HF caregiver burden and caregiver HRQL is suggested by this study's findings. Therefore, it is critical that nurses assess and intervene to improve the lives of HF caregivers to prevent caregiver health decline. The findings highlight the importance of including caregiver outcomes in HF-related research, particularly, lack of perceived family support as it affects patient hospitalizations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:09:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:09:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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