2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158541
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Exploration of What Nurses Want in Decisional Involvement
Abstract:
An Exploration of What Nurses Want in Decisional Involvement
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Scherb, Cindy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University
Contact Address:Nursing - Rochester Center, Rochester, MN, 55904-4497, USA
Co-Authors: J.P. Specht, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA and J. Loes, Mercy Medical Center - North Iowa, Mason City, IA
The American society is faced with the problem of a nursing shortage that is predicted to extend into the next two decades. Job satisfaction has been found to be closely related to retention of nurses and decisional involvement is an important antecedent to job satisfaction. The issue of decisional involvement is one that the nursing profession needs to closely evaluate to identify potential areas for change. The purpose of this study was to explore what aspects of decisional involvement were important to staff nurses and how these aspects were similar or dissimilar to nurse manager responses. The nurse sample included all RNs with clinical responsibilities employed by a rural healthcare network in the Midwest. The instrument used was Haven & Vasey's Decisional Involvement Scale. Questionnaires were distributed to 857 nurses within the network with a 39% return rate. The mean age of the nurse sample was 43.4 years. They had a mean of 17.4 years of experience, a mean of 14.2 years in the organization, and were primarily educated at the associate degree (57.2%) level. The nurses were found to have a low level of perceived decisional involvement (mean = 44.25; range 21-105) and preferred more decisional involvement than they had (mean = 58.29; p = .000). Areas that staff nurses perceived they had less decisional involvement than nurse managers perceived they had were: recruitment of RNs, review of unit leader's performance, determination of unit budgetary and equipment/supply needs, and liaison with other departments related to patient care. This presentation will include further description of the study findings and implications for nursing administration. Areas in which staff nurses prefer more decisional involvement and the differences identified by nurse managers will be described. Discussion will include how nursing administration can impact the areas of needed improvement in decisional involvement.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Exploration of What Nurses Want in Decisional Involvementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158541-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Exploration of What Nurses Want in Decisional Involvement</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scherb, Cindy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing - Rochester Center, Rochester, MN, 55904-4497, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cscherb@winona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value"> J.P. Specht, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA and J. Loes, Mercy Medical Center - North Iowa, Mason City, IA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The American society is faced with the problem of a nursing shortage that is predicted to extend into the next two decades. Job satisfaction has been found to be closely related to retention of nurses and decisional involvement is an important antecedent to job satisfaction. The issue of decisional involvement is one that the nursing profession needs to closely evaluate to identify potential areas for change. The purpose of this study was to explore what aspects of decisional involvement were important to staff nurses and how these aspects were similar or dissimilar to nurse manager responses. The nurse sample included all RNs with clinical responsibilities employed by a rural healthcare network in the Midwest. The instrument used was Haven &amp; Vasey's Decisional Involvement Scale. Questionnaires were distributed to 857 nurses within the network with a 39% return rate. The mean age of the nurse sample was 43.4 years. They had a mean of 17.4 years of experience, a mean of 14.2 years in the organization, and were primarily educated at the associate degree (57.2%) level. The nurses were found to have a low level of perceived decisional involvement (mean = 44.25; range 21-105) and preferred more decisional involvement than they had (mean = 58.29; p = .000). Areas that staff nurses perceived they had less decisional involvement than nurse managers perceived they had were: recruitment of RNs, review of unit leader's performance, determination of unit budgetary and equipment/supply needs, and liaison with other departments related to patient care. This presentation will include further description of the study findings and implications for nursing administration. Areas in which staff nurses prefer more decisional involvement and the differences identified by nurse managers will be described. Discussion will include how nursing administration can impact the areas of needed improvement in decisional involvement.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:09:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:09:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.