2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158542
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Outcomes Effectiveness for Elders With Pneumonia and CHF
Abstract:
Nursing Outcomes Effectiveness for Elders With Pneumonia and CHF
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Scherb, Cindy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University
Contact Address:Nursing - Rochester Center, Rochester, MN, 55904-4497, USA
Co-Authors:B.J. Head, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; M.L. Maas, S. Moorhead, D. Reed, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; D. Conley, Nebraska Methodist Hospital, Omaha, NE; B. Weinberg, Finger Lakes Health Sy
Electronic clinical documentation systems are typically not fully integrated for all aspects of patient care. There are few hospital systems with nursing data that can be retrieved from numerous data modules and repositories to be aggregated in a common data warehouse. Some of the difficulties are: variables not computerized, variables difficult to locate, variables difficult to download, and the need for abstracting of data from paper records. Because of these problems, specific procedures must be developed for data retrieval and downloading into a data warehouse. A warehouse needs a database structure that is amenable to analysis, and this must be developed, verified, and tested. Nursing effectiveness research studies can only begin after these preparatory activities are complete. Two pilot studies were undertaken using secondary clinical data from four community hospitals to investigate the effectiveness of nursing interventions on older persons (60- 89 years of age) with the diagnoses of pneumonia and CHF. The specific aims of the studies were to: 1) describe the most frequent NANDAi diagnoses, NIC interventions, and NOC outcomes documented by nurses, 2) describe the process of data retrieval for all variables needed to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of nursing interventions, 3) pilot test the development of a data warehouse for a larger study to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of nursing interventions, and 4) describe the intervals of measurement, change, and variation in outcome status throughout the hospital length of stay. This presentation will describe the process of collecting data necessary for conducting nursing effectiveness research and the development of a data warehouse. The most frequently documented nursing diagnoses, interventions, and patient outcomes will be identified and intervals of outcome measurement will be described. The change and variation in each of the NOC outcomes will be described. The ability to extract and utilize standardized nursing languages and other variables to determine the effectiveness of nursing care will be demonstrated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Outcomes Effectiveness for Elders With Pneumonia and CHFen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158542-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Outcomes Effectiveness for Elders With Pneumonia and CHF</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scherb, Cindy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing - Rochester Center, Rochester, MN, 55904-4497, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cscherb@winona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B.J. Head, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; M.L. Maas, S. Moorhead, D. Reed, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; D. Conley, Nebraska Methodist Hospital, Omaha, NE; B. Weinberg, Finger Lakes Health Sy</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Electronic clinical documentation systems are typically not fully integrated for all aspects of patient care. There are few hospital systems with nursing data that can be retrieved from numerous data modules and repositories to be aggregated in a common data warehouse. Some of the difficulties are: variables not computerized, variables difficult to locate, variables difficult to download, and the need for abstracting of data from paper records. Because of these problems, specific procedures must be developed for data retrieval and downloading into a data warehouse. A warehouse needs a database structure that is amenable to analysis, and this must be developed, verified, and tested. Nursing effectiveness research studies can only begin after these preparatory activities are complete. Two pilot studies were undertaken using secondary clinical data from four community hospitals to investigate the effectiveness of nursing interventions on older persons (60- 89 years of age) with the diagnoses of pneumonia and CHF. The specific aims of the studies were to: 1) describe the most frequent NANDAi diagnoses, NIC interventions, and NOC outcomes documented by nurses, 2) describe the process of data retrieval for all variables needed to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of nursing interventions, 3) pilot test the development of a data warehouse for a larger study to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of nursing interventions, and 4) describe the intervals of measurement, change, and variation in outcome status throughout the hospital length of stay. This presentation will describe the process of collecting data necessary for conducting nursing effectiveness research and the development of a data warehouse. The most frequently documented nursing diagnoses, interventions, and patient outcomes will be identified and intervals of outcome measurement will be described. The change and variation in each of the NOC outcomes will be described. The ability to extract and utilize standardized nursing languages and other variables to determine the effectiveness of nursing care will be demonstrated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:09:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:09:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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